The 16th-annual Waterloo Arts Fest is this weekend

Waterloo Arts Fest logo

(provided courtesy of Waterloo Arts)

The 16th-Annual Waterloo Arts Fest is Saturday, June 30, 2018, from 12 p.m. to 7 p.m.  in the Waterloo Arts & Entertainment District, Cleveland, on Waterloo Rd. between E. 161 St. and Calcutta Ave. and features more than 40 local bands playing a great mix of music, local handmade art vendors, CLE’s best food trucks, and an exciting mix of innovative and interactive art experiences for all ages. At the Waterloo Arts Fest, you can roll up your sleeves, get your hands dirty and give art a try.

This community event is produced by Waterloo Arts, a nonprofit art center whose mission is to enrich the neighborhood culturally and economically by creating a stimulating arts environment through exhibits, performances, special events, and educational programming for people of all ages. In addition to orchestrating this festival, Waterloo Arts manages an art gallery, public art projects, a community arts center and artist studios.

What’s new this year? 
This year we are excited to introduce an artist residency program to the event. For four to six weeks leading up to the festival, selected artists will create a temporary art installation that will be presented at the festival, and fans can follow along as the artists post progress shots of their work leading up to the big reveal. This year’s artists are Angela Oster and Susie Underwood. Each year, we would like to add residencies until we have as many as 20 artists creating large-scale installations for the event.

For more info and an event program, visit waterlooarts.org/fest.

What type of employer is HGR? Buyer Spotlight with Blake Hughes

HGR Industrial Surplus Buyer Blake Hughes with wife, daughter and dog
HGR Industrial Surplus Buyer Blake Hughes with wife, Kendra, daughter, Lennon, and dog, Ernie Banks

When did you start with HGR and why?

I started April 2016. Previously, I had worked in sales for AT&T and two steel companies. When I spoke with HGR’s human resources manager and learned more about the opportunity with HGR it seemed like a great fit.

What is your territory, and what do you do on a daily basis?

My territory is Eastern Iowa, most of Illinois, and Northwestern Indiana. On a daily basis I travel to different manufacturing facilities to view and inspect their surplus machinery. In between visits I follow up with customers on offers we’ve made and attempt to close deals and buy the equipment.

What do you like most about your job?

Travelling and visiting different manufacturing plants. I’ve always had an interest in manufacturing and seeing how things are made. I like being on the road and meeting new people.

What’s your greatest challenge?

I’m still relatively new to the machinery industry; so, my biggest challenge so far has been learning all the different types of machinery and equipment that HGR purchases.

What’s your most interesting moment at HGR?

Walking through HGR for the first time. It is hard to believe just how much equipment is going in and out of the facility on a daily basis. I tell customers all the time that if they get the chance they should take a trip to HGR. It’s a great place.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

Hanging out with friends and family, traveling, golfing. My #1 hobby is watching the Chicago Cubs (sorry Indians fans).

Who is your hero or greatest influence/inspiration, and why?

My dad and my grandpa. Both have taught me through example how important it is to work hard and do things the right way. Being considerate and listening to your customers goes a long way in building relationships.

Anything I missed that you want everyone to know?

I’ve only been with HGR for just over two years but I have loved every moment of it. It’s a very good feeling to know the owners and employees all care about making the company improve on a daily basis. I look forward to continuing my career and being with HGR for a long time.

Local manufacturer’s bushings and precision-machined components used in mines all over the world

Tim Lining of SC Industries

Timothy Lining, vice president and general manager of SC Industries, Euclid, Ohio is the husband of the founder’s granddaughter, Karla. Karla’s grandfather, Karl Schulz, started the business in 1946 with two partners on Luther Ave. near East 72nd St., Cleveland. It was then called Skyway Machine Products. Later, they moved to St. Clair Ave. and then to Euclid in the 1960s because the entire family lived in the area and, eventually, his children graduated from Euclid High School. In 1973, Earl Lauridsen, the founder’s son-in-law and Tim’s father-in-law, joined the company and remains the current owner and president. In late 2003, Skyway Machine was shut down, and it was planned for the company to be liquidated because of the downturn and difficult economic conditions. However, in early 2004, new orders started to return, and a new business was formed called SC Industries to handle new orders. Tim joined the company in 2004 to temporarily “help out” in the shop and has been coming back ever since. In late 2007, Earl’s partner and brother-in-law Ralph Fross passed away. At that time, Tim took over the front office.

But, his experience in the industry predates his employment at SC Industries. He’s worked in molding and machining since 1991, is a skilled CNC programmer, earned his degree in business management in 2007 and has taken additional CNC classes at Lakeland Community College. When asked why he went into machining, he says, “I like to do things with my hands and build things. When I was younger, I had a part-time job in a shop on Saturdays and liked it and the computerized machines, as well as the new technology coming in. I said to myself, ‘I want to learn how to run one of those things.’” His current role at SC Industries involves estimating, engineering, raw materials purchase, order entry and customer communication.

SC Industries manufactures precision, hardened-metal bushings and pins that are used in off-road construction, mining, transportation, printing, packaging and other industries. The company’s machinists precision machine steel, bronze, stainless steel and other metals to create bushings — a bearing or metal lining for a round hole in which an axle revolves. In simpler terms, according to Tim, “When you see devices where something is rotating, turning, or has a bending elbow, there is a pin and bushing, so that the bushing wears out from the friction instead of the equipment’s arm assembly. Then, it can be pulled and replaced.” The company also inspects the raw materials, heat treating and finished components to make sure that they meet stringent industry standards.

One of SC Industries’ biggest customers is Caterpillar, but their bushings and pins are used all over the world in digging equipment and in haul trucks that move loads of sand, pay dirt for gold mining, and rocks to crushers. The loads weigh more than 250,000 pounds, and the trucks are used in mines in Africa, Australia, Tasmania, South America, Canada and the United States. These are not the dump trucks that you see driving down the road. The tires alone on these are taller than a person. These bushings have to be heavy duty and range in size from ¾” to 16” in diameter by 12” long.

mining truck

Twenty-five people keep the company running and orders going out, including administrative staff, a quality manager, a production manager, CNC machinists, grinding machine technicians, general labor and maintenance. Most of these employees have worked for SC Industries for many years. When Tim was asked what his greatest challenge is, he responds, as most manufacturers do, “Finding quality, new employees, but I’m willing to hire people with no experience and train them from the ground up in SC Industries’ way of doing things. We are fortunate to have a great bunch of employees.” He continues, “Years ago, the schools started pushing college prep and did away with vocational and technical training, but it’s coming back. In my son’s high school, he can take HVAC, CAD, CNC and four to five other technical trade courses as electives.”

With regard to the state of manufacturing in Ohio, he says, “Business is driven by the large OEMs (national or multinational companies). The success of small businesses depends on how they are doing, and right now they are all at full throttle. In the last year, orders have noticeably increased. When commodity pricing is driven down, mining grinds to a halt. So, certain policies help or hurt manufacturing, but we have a bright future now. In 2004, we had four or five CNC turning centers; today, we are up to about 15. One of our most recent additions gives us a nice jump in size capacity, and I’ve been told it’s one of the larger 4-axis turning centers in the area with capacity to turn 32 ½’ x 98” in length and more than 8” of Y-axis milling travel.”

In getting to know the man behind the machine, Tim was asked what inspires him. He says, “I’m a devout Christian who is inspired by Jesus, and I want to see God’s love lived out in people’s lives. The Golden Rule is how I treat my employees — the way that I want to be treated.” He also gives back to the community by machining the parts for Euclid High School’s Robotics Team’s competition battle bot, donating money to charitable organizations and being a member of the Euclid Chamber of Commerce.

He also cares about the environment. He invested in LED lights and air cleaners/mist collectors for the shop. He switched from heat blowers to radiant heat tubes that heat the equipment and walls more efficiently and make for a better environment for his employees.

Tim has three sons and his wife, Karla, of 21 years. He says, “I wear many hats, especially here at work, but I like to separate between the work and the home hats. On the work side, I generally enjoy what we do here, and since I used to run CNCs, I enjoy being around that and making things that make all of our lives better. On the family side, that is the reason I am passionate about work – to support and provide for them – but, I also am responsible to provide for their spiritual nurture and development. I also want that to come through in the way that we run our business.”

SC Industries sleeves in grind process
Sleeves in grind process

An HGR customer keeps The Stone Oven Bakery’s equipment running

Stone Oven Bakery bread

Have you ever gone to the Cedar Lee Theatre then headed to The Stone Oven afterward to have a bite to eat, coffee and discuss the movie? I belonged to an independent moviegoers group on Meetup.com that used to do just that. Little did I know that I would eventually work for a company (HGR Industrial Surplus) that supplied some of the parts to our customer Christopher Palda so that he could fix the bakery’s oven. You can read his story here where he explains this project. The oven was made in Italy, and they can’t get parts for it anymore. He had to manufacture the parts himself.

(Q&A with The Stone Oven’s Co-owner Tatyana Rehn)

When and why did you open Stone Oven Bakery?

In 1993, I had a craving for the crusty breads of my European homeland and could not find them in my new home of Cleveland, I began making my own bread then working all hours of the night to make loaves for family and friends. What started as a hobby turned into a business providing many Clevelanders with hearth-baked European bread.

In 1995, after several years of selling wholesale to restaurants and grocery stores, my husband and I decided to create a bread and pastry bakery with a European café. Our first location was in Cleveland Heights with two additional stores opening during the next 10 years in the Galleria at Erieview and in Eton-Chagrin Shopping Center. In addition to European breads and pastries, we offer soups, salads and sandwiches.

How many people work for The Stone Oven?

About 35 people in the restaurants, 11 in the bakery and three drivers

What is your favorite item on the menu?

Bread

What is your favorite style of bread?

Black bread, which is sourdough based

How did you meet Christopher Palda, HGR’s customer who has done your equipment repairs?

Through a mutual friend who worked with my ex-husband. We had a problem with our furnace at home and called the mutual friend to see if he could help. He said that he couldn’t fix it but he knew someone who could. That was 15 years ago. Since then he has repaired anything and everything at the bakery. If it weren’t for him, I wouldn’t be in business. He has been my savior.

What happened to the oven and how was it fixed?

It wasn’t just the oven. It was the mixer and general repairs. He keeps it all running. There’s no permanent fix for the oven. It’s a constant maintenance.

What do you do when you are not baking and running the restaurant?

My partner runs the restaurant side. I run the bakery side and am in charge of bread production and the bread manufacturing business. In addition to supplying The Stone Oven, we sell wholesale to restaurants and stores. Outside of bakery time, I go to the gym, spend time with my Yorkie and travel. My next trip is to Ireland.

What inspires you?

Changing things up so that I don’t get bored, sometimes, something I’ve seen in a magazine or something that strikes my fancy. I’m not hands-on anymore and miss playing with the dough, but I turn to life and to customer feedback for inspiration.

After so many successful years in business, what advice do you have for other restaurant entrepreneurs?

Entrepreneurs often don’t come for advice but they should do it more often. Do not risk more than you can afford to lose. I hate to see people destroy themselves. It’s hard to pick up the pieces when you are emotionally and financially devastated. Know your stuff! For me, baking was just a hobby, and I didn’t know how to organize and run a business. I learned on the fly and don’t recommend it to anyone. I actually, was very lucky. It was serendipity at the time because we filled a void in the community, and I had a passion.

What has been your greatest challenge?

The employees, but not in the way you might think. Like most businesses, it is hard to get and retain good employees because without them we are nothing. I don’t have that problem, though. I have a group of committed people, and many have been with me for 17-20 years. They are dedicated. My main issue is dealing with my own guilt about trying to compensate them enough but still make sense for the business. I want to be fair to them so they can have quality of life and a good standard of living. I can’t wait for the day when I am not responsible for anyone but myself.

What has been your best moment at or favorite thing about The Stone Oven?

It has to be when we were in our former location on the corner. We were there for 10-12 years in a leased space when the rent tripled. The landlord had an inquiry from a bank who wanted to buy the space; so, he thought he would increase the rent to equal the offer or else sell it. My partner printed flyers that he put on the windows and doors. This got the community out. The mayor wrote to the bank president, “Stone Oven is the fabric of our community and has to remain where it is. We have plenty of other properties that we can show you.” They cocooned us and protected us. That’s a testament to how much we mean to the community. We are a neighborhood joint and want to be people’s home away from home. Shortly after that, the opportunity to buy our current location arose; so, we moved down a block and have owned our building for 13 years. We’re a family business and people know us personally. The items on the menu are named after members of the family, including my two daughters who worked here for years.

What does the future look like?

We’ve signed a five-year lease in Eton, but we have no plans to expand with new locations.

Tatyana Rehn, owner Stone Oven Bakery

Cleveland Institute of Art graduate and HGR customer works as industrial designer

Greg Martin recording paper cyanotype

 

(Q&A with Greg Martin, director of design, Kichler Lighting)

Why did you decide to go to school at Cleveland Institute of Art?

I went to a college-prep Catholic high school with not even a generic art class. In spite of this, all I knew is I wanted to go to art school. Despite the best efforts of my teachers, my parents, and the school counselor (whose career testing indicated I was best suited to be a farmer), I convinced my parents enough that they agreed to let me apply at CIA. CIA was the only choice as I knew it was a great school, and it was close to home (meaning I could save money and live at home). I started at CIA intent on going into illustration, but changed course last minute to industrial design.

 What is your best memory of CIA or what did you learn that got you to where you are today?

Best memory of CIA is being able to explore and delve into many different mediums, despite being an industrial design major — glass, sculpture, printmaking, and ceramics. All were amazing experiences. Back then the five-year program allowed for much “play” outside of your major, which had a great impact on me. I learned how to think and to ask “what if.” I also learned that the more you worked the more you got out of it. Richard Fiorelli, who I had the pleasure of having for sophomore design, was the most influential professor by far in my five years at CIA. I didn’t realize it until much later in my career. I just wish I had the foresight to have known it when I was back in school as I would have spent more time with him.

Do you consider yourself an artist or a maker?

Artist

 What do you create and with what types of materials?

Sculpture, furniture, decorative objects (functional and non-functional), ceramics, photographic images

 How long have you been an HGR customer?

Fellow CIA Student Matt Beckwith introduced me to HGR in 2005 or 2006.

 What have found at HGR that you incorporated into your work?

This list could go on for pages, literally. Everything from things I incorporated into sculptures (firehoses, chains, conveyor belts, tooling, robotic parts, electronics), to items used in the creation of art and furniture, but not incorporated into the final piece (cameras, microscopes, misc. lenses, clamps, etc.), to items that help me in preparing to create (mixing bottles, rinse trays, etc.) I also have used HGR for materials in creating for my work (old tools and hardware for creating NERF gun prototypes), as well as for inspiration for my design work in the toy and the lighting fields.

Would you recommend HGR to other artists and makers?

Not only would I recommend it, I would say it’s a must for all creative artists/makers.

What do you do when you are not creating art? Career? Hobbies?

I am an industrial designer/product designer; so, “creating” makes up the bulk of what I do. I have taken field trips with our design team at work to get inspiration from walking the aisles of HGR. I also play guitar and banjo when time allows.

What inspires you?

Just about anything/everything. I try to keep my eyes and mind open to seeing as much as I can and asking “what if.” Creative people and creative solutions inspire me.

Where can we find your work?

My website (in progress) is gmartinstudio.com.

Greg Martin share chair/bench

Euclid Chamber of Commerce Lunch by the Lake

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

Kick off the summer with lunch on June 21 from 12-1 p.m. on the terrace at Henn Mansion, 23131 Lakeshore Blvd., overlooking the lake. Bring your business cards for a chance to win a door prize (and, of course, to share with others).  Updated information on chamber member benefits and discount programs will be available. Please click here to register. The cost is $15 for members and $20 for non-members.

High school senior takes senior photos at HGR Industrial Surplus

John Willett senior picture at HGR Industrial Surplus

(Q&A with John Willett, Strongsville High School and Polaris Career Center graduating senior)

Where did you go to high school?

Strongsville High School and Polaris Career Center for precision CNC machining

Where are you future career plans?

I do not have college plans at this point.  I worked full time as a temp at Efficient Machine Products during summer 2017, returned through Polaris’ early placement program and am now working there full time.

What is your intended career path?

I want to become a CNC machinist.

What do you enjoy doing when you are not in school?

Tinkering and learning engineering, metal and woodworking through videos, especially about military application and armor. I don’t read much because it’s time consuming. I prefer to listen and watch videos. Currently, I watch a lot of gun and history-related content. I find the inner workings of guns to be fascinating.

How did you hear about HGR Industrial Surplus?

Through my step-dad who is an engineer for Ramco.

Why are you a customer?

I like the wide selection and varying things offered.  Great prices

What types of things have you bought at HGR and how have you used them?

Various.  My step-dad’s company buys and sells to HGR. I recently bought a blower fan and plan on making plate armor out of it.

What inspires you?

Creativity.  I have a lot of ideas that I like to explore in discussion and action. I pull most of my inspiration from video games, movies and YouTube.

What made you decide to do your senior pictures at HGR?

My mom asked me, and it was the first place I thought of. I also think it’s a neat place and would be something special for my photos.

John Willett senior picture at HGR Industrial SurplusJohn Willett senior picture at HGR Industrial SurplusJohn Willett senior picture at HGR Industrial Surplus

3D designer also creates sculptures with objects found at HGR

Matthew Beckwith, partner at Photonic Studio, and HGR Industrial Surplus customer

Why did you decide to go to school at Cleveland Institute of Art?

I originally wanted to be a car designer. CIA was a better fit for me than other schools focused on automotive design that were located in Detroit and San Francisco. After trying cars for a year, I decided product design was a better fit for me.

What is your best memory of CIA?

Some of my best memories from CIA came from classes taught by Richard Fiorelli. His classes had a hands-on approach to working with materials that delivered results I would otherwise not think to sketch out. This hands-on concept of “play” to iterate concepts is something that has stuck with me throughout my career.

Do you consider yourself an artist or a maker?

I guess I would say “designer.” For my day job (creative director /partner at Photonic Studio), I make things for other people to communicate and visualize their ideas. I suppose that I am a “maker” as a hobby because I love to tinker and experiment.

[editor’s note: Photonic creates 3D architectural renderings, product renderings 3D illustration, animation and interactive environments. These photos showcase some of their work.]

What do you make and with what types of materials?

With materials from HGR I have made some various sculptures. I have worked with everything from charts and thermocromatic graph papers, to conveyor belts and giant rubber bands. Often the bulk nature of materials at HGR lends itself to play and experimentation. I, generally, like to look for unique things that are on their way to scrap and can be purchased for as little as possible. I like the idea that we can upcycle things that were on their way to the landfill or scrapyard.

How long have you been an HGR customer?

My first trip to HGR was in 2005ish.

What have found at HGR that you incorporated into your work?

Unique chart and graph papers, thermocromatic papers, robot parts, conveyor chains, giant drill bits, refractory bricks. Too much to list, honestly.

Would you recommend HGR to other artists and makers?

Always. Aside from being super interesting to look around, it offers all sorts of things you just wouldn’t find at Home Depot or an arts store.

What do you do when you are not doing your personal work?

I am a designer at Photonic Studio. We are a creative and visualization agency that focuses on 3D modeling for animation and interactive. Lately, this means we are working on lots of exciting projects in augmented and virtual reality. Traditionally, we have worked with clients in design fields, as well as marketing and communications teams at all sorts of companies.

What inspires you?

I love being optimistic about the future. The ability to work with new technologies and create interactive experiences that could not happen in the physical world is exciting. I also have a love for manufacturing and find the process and tools of production to be beautiful. Often the limitations of a process or technology give me something to reach for as I develop concepts. Also science. I love NASA, SpaceX, JPL, LHC, NIF, and all sorts of amazing machines built for science.

Where can we find your work?

My day-to-day work can be seen at www.photonicstudio.com.

Ford truck rendering by Photonic Studio 3D illustration by Photonic Studio 3D illustration by Photonic Studio 3D architectural rendering by Photonic Studio 3D architectural rendering by Photonic Studio motion graphic by Photonic Studio

Rules for the revolution

clock with change

(Courtesy of Guest Blogger Alex Pendleton, Big Ideas for Small Companies powered by the MPI Group)

Alec Pendleton

In my last blog in March — “Time For A Revolution” — I described experiences I’ve had with organizations in need of major change. Now I’d like to look at principles I’ve found helpful in starting down the turbulent path ahead. Revolution is possible without them, but it runs a lot more smoothly when they are followed. I’ll focus on manufacturing, because that’s where I’ve had most of my experience, but the principles apply in any situation.

First, you’ve got to have a vision — and in the more detail, the better. Every factory runs on a variety of systems: to initiate orders, to schedule workstations, to store inventory, to measure efficiency, to assure quality, and many more. Some of these are clean applications of specific theories (Just-in-Time, Theory of Constraints, etc.), while others may have started clean, but have degenerated over time. Others were simply made up as the company went along. Typically, whatever symptom has triggered your need for revolution – bad delivery, quality problems, inventory issues – is the result of a breakdown of one or more of these systems.

It’s always tempting at this point to look for a silver bullet. You read an article (or a blog!), or go to a seminar, and you have an “Aha!” moment. “That’s it! Lean manufacturing [or whatever has caught your fancy] is the answer! All we have to do is install that, and our problems will vanish!” But “all we have to do …” is a dangerous statement.  If you leap into major change without fully understanding the implications —and potential unintended consequences — you’re likely to trade the old problem for a new one.

So: Think it through! Envision every step of the way, and how each step will affect everything around it. Imagine what might go wrong, and have a plan to fix everything. Obviously, you can’t do this to perfection, but the more thinking and planning you do before you go live, the better chance you’ll have of a smooth launch.

Next, clear the decks! STOP doing things that aren’t working. Early in my career, I struggled with a small company with three unrelated divisions. The largest was a perpetual headache, consuming most of management’s attention in exchange for occasional small profits. A second division was tiny, and an also-ran in its market, overshadowed by larger and more professional competitors. The third was starved for resources, but had potential — and was central to my vision of what the company could become. But before I could work on that vision, I had to get rid of the other two divisions. I sold the larger one, to a yet-larger and more professional competitor, and I closed the tiny one. Rid of those distractions, I was then able to concentrate on my vision. Sales quadrupled in seven years, and we turned a chronic loss into a perpetual profit.

Similarly, in another plant later in my career, there was a peripheral product line that we struggled to produce. Quality and efficiency were inadequate, and we invested enormous effort into trying to fix it. Our sales team felt that the product was important to our overall offering, so I arranged to simply buy the stuff, marked with our label, from a competitor. Profitability improved, but even more important, we removed a distraction — allowing us to focus on our primary business.

Before you start your revolution, ask yourself two questions:

  1. Do you have a detailed vision?
  2. Even more important, can you rid yourself of distractions so that you can focus on the vision?

I’ll have more rules for revolution in my next blog!

Bitesize Business Workshop: Exploring different learning styles

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

Join the Euclid Chamber of Commerce at Moore Counseling & Mediation Services, 22639 Euclid Ave., Euclid, Ohio on June 14 from 8:30-10 a.m. for an educational discussion. The workshop will be presented by Matthew Selker and Dr. Dale Hartz.

There is no cost to attend.  Membership is not required.

Please RSVP to Jasmine Poston at 216-404-1900 or jposton@moorecounseling.com.

Bitesize Business Workshop: Financial Workshop for Small Businesses I

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

Join the Euclid Chamber of Commerce at Euclid Public Library, 631 E. 222nd St., Euclid, Ohio, on June 12 from 8:30-10 a.m. for an educational discussion. Are you thinking of starting a business? Or have you been in business for several years? If so, this workshop was designed for you. It will cover:

  • Finances 101
  • Startup expenses
  • Cash vs. accrual accounting
  • Separating personal and business expenses
  • Budgets and financial planning
  • Q&A session

There is no cost to attend.  Membership is not required.

Please register here.

Waterloo Arts Juried Exhibition opening reception June 1

Waterloo Arts juried exhibition Damp by Katy Richards
“Damp” by Katy Richards

The annual Waterloo Arts Juried Exhibition is presented in partnership with Praxis Fiber Workshop and Brick Ceramic + Studio Design with artwork selected by 2018 Guest Juror Ray Juaire, senior exhibitions manager at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland. The work of 87 artists from the U.S. and Canada will be on display at Waterloo Arts, Praxis Fiber Workshop and Brick Ceramic + Design Studio. Awards are sponsored by Brick Ceramic + Design Studio, CAN Journal, Praxis Fiber Workshop, The Sculpture Garden, Waterloo Arts, and Zygote Press, Inc. Meet the 2018 juror and participating artists on June 1 from 6-9 p.m. during the districtwide opening reception at 15605 Waterloo Rd., Cleveland, featuring live music and light refreshments.

The show will run from June 1 to July 21, 2018.