Summer art-camp students design and build wind chimes using reclaimed materials

Larry Fielder of Rust Dust & Other 4 Letter Words
Larry advising and ensuring safety

Waterloo Arts offered its annual Round Robin summer arts camp to children aged 6-13. The first session was held July 9-20 and the second session is July 23-Aug. 3. HGR Industrial Surplus was a sponsor because we are invested in S.T.E.A.M. education.

more raw materials Waterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter Words raw materials

On July 17, the students used repurposed, reclaimed and salvaged materials at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter Words to make wind chimes. Larry Fielder, owner, found 90% of the materials at Goodwill and The Salvation Army. Students used wire, drills and other hand tools to put together their metal and wood creations. It was amazing to watch the teamwork as they engineered and problem solved together to create functional and decorative objects.

Waterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter Words

Local community college assists manufacturers with setting up state-approved apprenticeship training programs

 

Chrissy Cooney of LCCC(Q&A with Christin (aka Chrissy) Cooney, program coordinator, Lorain County Community College)

When did the apprenticeship programs begin at LCCC?

LCCC did customized apprenticeships for individual companies, including Ford, for 30 years, and still does. But, the new state-approved apprenticeship training program counts toward a degree and is registered with and approved by the state, not just internal to the company. The Medina County pilot, in partnership with Cuyahoga Community College, began in January 2017 with the first group of students starting their apprenticeship training in August 2017. Next term, they will be on machines at Medina County Career Center with LCCC and Tri-C faculty teaching. Each semester, the apprentices take one course through Tri-C and one course through LCCC, but the LCCC faculty members travel to Tri-C to teach the courses there for the pilot companies from Medina County. There currently are 15 shared students in the program with eight registered to LCCC and seven registered to Tri-C. We have taken collaboration to a new level and broken down barriers between colleges.

What is the difference between an apprenticeship and an approved state-registered apprenticeship?

ApprenticeOhio, a division of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, approves these apprenticeships, and these apprentices are required to meet strict codes. Students end up with a credential that’s nationally portable. Employers are recognized for maintaining high standards of quality training and advancement.  LCCC offers lots of support for the employers, which results in better retention of skilled talent.

What manufacturing apprenticeships do you offer?

Currently, we offer apprenticeships in all of the programs in the engineering division, including alternative energy, automation engineering, construction, digital fabrication, electronic engineering, engineering technology, industrial safety, manufacturing engineering, mechatronics, welding, but not all of them are state-registered. We are trying to get digital fabrication, industrial safety, mechatronics and welding into the state-approved program since those are the fields where employees can succeed with training and a journeyman’s card, while the other areas usually require a bachelor’s degree to work in the field. The current state-registered cohort is in tool & die. We already have submitted industrial safety to the state and will be submitting welding and agriculture next.

How does a company become part of this program?

They need to sign on as a partner with a letter of support and have one journeyman, or someone with equivalent experience, in their organization per apprentice who is willing to supervise on-the-job training.

Do the students or the participating companies get paid?

These apprenticeships are a win-win for everyone: The sponsoring company gets skilled employees and a $2,500 stipend from the state through April 2019 for each new apprentice; the apprentice continues to earn a full-time salary while their classes paid are for by their employer, which means no student-loan debt and years of income; and Tri-C and LCCC get students.

In the end, it only costs a participating company about $2,500 in educational costs, after the stipend, to develop a high-potential employee into a skilled, state-licensed journeyman. In addition, the registered apprentice has a state identification number, not just a college certification. So, when he or she finishes, that person is a journeyman who is qualified to work anywhere in the industry, not just trained in that company’s methods. Finally, the student will graduate with a one-year certification or an associate’s degree that can be applied to further education.

How long do the apprenticeships run?

The current tool & die program requires 780 contact (in-class) hours with the teacher, 32 semester credit hours and 8,000 hours of on-the-job training. It takes about 3.5 years to complete the course credit, since there are no summer classes held so that employees can work overtime during the busy season then another six months to complete the work hours. So, in four years, apprentices get the “golden ticket.”

Which companies currently are participating?

Twelve companies came to us and said they would each bring at least one employee in order for the class to run. We ran with 15 students in this first cohort who currently work for Automation Tool & Die, Clamco, Atlantic Tool & Die, Shiloh Industries, and Superior Roll Forming.

How do you help the sponsoring companies?

Since most human resources teams do not have the time to administer an apprenticeship in a small- to mid-sized company, we shift the burden of administrative duties to the college as the sponsor. We do all of the paperwork and work with the state.

What is does the RAMP acronym at LCCC refer to?

Retooling Adults in Manufacturing Programs. It’s basically an acronym that we use to brand our restructured manufacturing programs that now have stackable credentials to allow students to build on their education and training with a certificate, a one-year degree and an associate’s degree that is then transferrable to a four-year university toward a bachelor’s degree for fields that require one.

Do you currently have a mobile classroom?

We have an eight-student mobile welding trailer sponsored by Lincoln Electric, and Cuyahoga Community College has a manufacturing trailer. We rent the trailers to each other in order to share resources to best serve our students.

What is planned for the future?

As mentioned, we hope to add other areas of the engineering program to the state-registered apprenticeship training process, but since we are doing manufacturing well, we would like to add information technology, health care and other business-related areas in partnership with Cuyahoga Community College. And, we ALWAYS are looking for faculty in the trades who can teach part time around their work schedules.

Nick on of the students in LCCC's apprenticeship training program
Nick, one of the apprentices in the first cohort with LCCC/Tri-C’s apprenticeship training program

Euclid Chamber of Commerce hosting civilian response to active shooter event

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

 

On July 25 from 10-11:30 a.m. the Euclid Chamber of Commerce is holding CRASE: Civilian Response to Active Shooter Event presented by the Euclid Police Department for Euclid businesses at the Lincoln Electric Welding & Technology Center, 22800 St. Clair Ave., Euclid, Ohio.

In the last two years, there have been 50 active shooter incidents in the United States; four occurred in Ohio; 17 occurred in a business environment. This presentation can be helpful to business owners, human resources managers, security personnel, employees or anyone interested in learning more. Information presented may be useful when developing active-shooter policies and procedures for the workplace. Resources will be provided.

This event is free, and you do not need to be a chamber member to attend. Registration is required.

Please register here.

An HGR customer shares her creative repurposing story

spools purchased at HGR Industrial Surplus and re-used as plant display stands

(Courtesy of an HGR customer who wishes to remain anonymous)

We are an HGR Industrial Surplus family. My husband first noticed your sign on a drive by the area. Since he has a manufacturing background, he stopped in to see what you were all about. That was about 15 years ago.

My first purchase, after a few foraging trips, was a roll of fabric to use as skirting for tables for my garden club’s flower show. We are still using that fabric today. One thing led to another, and some of the other purchases for the garden club include spools to stack for pedestals to put flower arrangements on, cardboard tubes for short pedestals, and coat racks to display hats. We also bought industrial aprons and gloves to repurpose for fundraisers. Aisle 1 is my place to shop; you never know what you’ll find.

My husband and I have a few HGR chairs that we use in our home. One was a Saturday morning breakfast special for only $2.50! We have a very nice bookcase in our dining room. I also have a great carrying case for my laptop computer.

Two of our grandsons and other visiting family members have been taken to HGR to see what we feel is one of Cleveland’s attractions.

Highland Heights Garden Club displays purchased at HGR Industrial Surplus

HGR Industrial Surplus continues green initiatives

recycling at HGR

As a recycling company that buys industrial surplus and resells it to put it back into service and keep it out of landfills, recycling is part of our culture. As our Controller Ed Kneitel says, “We want to be good stewards of our environment.” To that end, we have been shredding paper and donating it to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History for cage bedding and animal enrichment. Our wooden skids and baled cardboard are picked up and recycled. We sell our used oil that is drained from equipment to someone who uses it to heat his building. During our renovation, we had energy-efficient lighting installed.

But, we decided to go one step further. We noticed that we were generating more than 85 gallons of plastic water bottles and 30-35 cases of aluminum pop cans per month and 200,000 pieces of paper per year. This week, we installed blue recycling bins for paper, plastic bottles and aluminum cans in both of our break rooms, the customer lounge and at individual desks. Now, our employees and customers can contribute to a more sustainable world.

Thanks for your participation when you visit HGR’s showroom!

Q&A with Beachland Ballroom’s Co-owner Cindy Barber

Cindy Barber and Mark Leddy, owners of Beachland Ballroom in Collinwood

Are you a musician?

No, but I am passionate about music.

What made you open a concert venue?

I worked for music/record companies, including Decca which later became MCA, when I was 18 doing office/administrative work and was exposed to the business. I took orders from people like Michael Stanley for their record stores.

I moved to the area because of the lake, rented for a while then bought a house on Lake Erie so I could look at the sunset every night. I was the editor of the Cleveland Free Times, which was bought by a chain. So, I moved on to do something to help the neighborhood. It took a lot of sweet talking with the banks because no one wanted to support a concert venue in North Collinwood.

What did you do prior to The Beachland?

I helped found the Cleveland Free Times and was a writer, editor and production manager. I also ran the production department at Northern Ohio Live.

How did The Beachland Ballroom get its name?

Euclid Beach Park, an amusement park from 1894 to 1969 operated in the area less than a half mile north of the building. The term “Beachland” became slang for the North Collinwood Neighborhood at that time, and the venue was named in homage to the era.

Why did you locate in Collinwood?

I’ve lived in Collinwood since 1986 and wanted to do a destination location in my neighborhood with the hope of heading off some of the crime starting to happen. I also knew that I couldn’t afford to open a place in the Flats or downtown. I found this former Croatian hall, brought in a sound man who said it could be a good club, approached Mark Leddy, who was booking bands at Pat’s in the Flats, to be my partner, and the rest is history.

How do you pick which musical acts to host?

My partner does most of the booking now. After 18 years on the map, booking agents who represent talent reach out to us, and we trust them to give us quality artists for reasonable prices.

How many acts have come through The Beachland to date?

Within three weeks of being open, the White Stripes played the Beachland. Mark booked a lot of garage rock that first month, and we were off to a good start. Since then, I would estimate that close to 30,000 bands have played The Beachland because, on average, we book three bands per night in each room five nights per week.

Who is your favorite musical artist?

I like music from the 60s – singer-songwriters like Carole King, Van Morrison and Springsteen.

What is your most memorable moment?

The first time we sold out the ballroom for the Black Keys. We helped them get started with their first manager and booking agent. They’re from Akron and played their first show ever at the Beachland.

What was your greatest challenge?

Not losing money on the acts. In our industry, the average profit margin is 1 percent. We can lose $3,500 in one night if we only sell 100 tickets. We have to pay a guarantee to a booking manager for different amounts such as $5,000, $10,000, etc. In Cleveland, there are more concert venues than ever and free outdoor festivals. We have the same number as Chicago, but they have more people. And, people still are afraid of the neighborhood. Things have changed here. It’s a grassroots Renaissance with a diverse community participating in the arts. This community is full of creative people who are trying new things, such as nonprofits and helping kids. People need to see the full scope of the neighborhood, and we need more support and participation. I want to get the neighborhood to support Waterloo and all of its organizations. All of the businesses can use clients and would appreciate your patronage.

I hear that you are involved in many ventures in the community including airbnbs. Tell us about some of your side projects.

I started a nonprofit called Cleveland Rocks: Past, Present and Future, which is a gallery specializing in music memorabilia. We hope to have rehearsal space in the former bowling alley next to the Beachland that we just purchased. We currently are looking for funding and donations to create a music incubator space with a black box video recording component to teach high school and college students how to create content for bands at reduced rates and also to capture live recordings from the Beachland. I try to help people who are moving into the area looking for available space. I own one Airbnb and manage two others.

What do you do when you are not working on these projects?

My dog goes to the office with me. My boyfriend is a big help to me all the time. He has sailed since he was a child; so, we bought a sailboat. I met him at the Beachland, of course, when his brother brought him to a show.

Beachland Ballroom

Bitesize Business Workshop: Financial Workshop for Small Businesses II

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

Join the Euclid Chamber of Commerce at Euclid Public Library, 631 E. 222nd St., Euclid, Ohio, on July 10 from 8:30-10 a.m. for an educational discussion. Are you thinking of starting a business? Or have you been in business for several years? If so, this workshop was designed for you. It will cover:

  • how to create a monthly, quarterly and annual accounting calendar
  • financial software
  • financial reports and how to read them

There is no cost to attend.  Membership is not required. The instructor is Kathleen M. Smychynsky of Kathleen J. Miller & Associates.

Please register here.

What type of employer is HGR? Buyer Spotlight with Ryan Usher

HGR Industrial Surplus Buyer Ryan Usher on inspection

(Q&A with one of HGR’s buyers, Ryan Usher)

When did you start with HGR, and why?        

I started in 2010 as a salesperson. It was my first job out of college.

What is your territory, and what do you do on a daily basis?

My territory is Michigan, Northwest Ohio, and Northeast Indiana.  I visit companies in this area daily looking for equipment to buy. Most of my time is spent with companies here in Michigan where I live.

What do you like most about your job?

I enjoy being able to see how things are made — everything from cars to foods. There’s always something interesting waiting for me each day.

What’s your greatest challenge?

Staying on top of a busy monthly schedule

What’s your most interesting moment at HGR?

I would say working a booth for HGR at a local industrial art show in Lakewood, Ohio.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

I like to play golf, go mountain biking and hang out on the lake.

Who is your hero or greatest influence/inspiration, and why?

My father. He worked hard to make a good life and always has great advice right when it was needed.

Euclid Chamber of Commerce accepting registration for 2018 golf outing

Euclid Chamber of Commerce golf outing

 

It’s time for the Annual Euclid Chamber of Commerce Golf Outing! Join us for a great day of golf with skill shots, skins games, giveaways and prizes starting at 10:30 a.m. on July 20 at Briardale Greens Golf Course.

All golfers receive lunch, beverages, golf with cart, one ticket to the 19th Hole BBQ, one entry to bocce roll contest, and one entry to darts contest. Single golfers will be assigned to a foursome.

Pre-purchase either mulligans or skins and receive the “String It Out” ($20 value). This 3-foot piece of string, can be used to improve a lie, sink a putt or move a putt. However, each time the string is brought into play, that length used must be cut off. When all the string is gone, it’s gone! (Mulligans: 2 per player $10 per player, $40 per foursome / Skins game $5 per player, $20 per foursome).

Not a golfer? Join us for the 19th Hole BBQ social from 4 – 6 p.m. and try your luck at games and prizes.

Please register here.