Local steel processor cuts rolled steel for use in automotive parts

Chesterfield Steel rolls

(courtesy of Allan Maggied, plant manager, Chesterfield Steel)

It all started in the early 1940s in an office on Dille Road when Baird Tewksbury opened Chesterfield Steel.  The original part of today’s building was an ALCOA storage shed located on Harvard Avenue.  Mr. Tewksbury had the building disassembled and reassembled, with additions, at the current 222nd and Tungsten location in Euclid, Ohio.  The facility now is 117,000 square feet.  Ed Weiner became Mr. Tewksbury’s partner in 1945.  Somewhere in the late 1950s to early 1960s Mr. Tewksbury sold his half of the business to Ernie Tallisman.  For a short time, the business was called Weiner-Tallisman.  After Mr. Weiner’s passing in 1967, the Weiner family sold their portion of the business to Mr. Tallisman, and the Tallisman family owned the business until 2008 when it was purchased by Lerman Enterprises and became Steel Warehouse Cleveland, LLC, dba Chesterfield Steel.

The business purchases .012 – .410-inch-thick flat-rolled sheet steel coils from various mills, and some from Holland.  Coils are shipped into the Port of Cleveland and trucked to Euclid where they are processed to customer specs by slitting, blanking, or sheeting.  Historically, Chesterfield has found a niche in the hot-roll pickle product.

When carbon steel coils are produced, they first come off the production line as a “black coil” due to the carbon left on the surface from rolling.  To remove the carbon, these coils are run through an acid bath called “pickling,” and then oiled.  Additional rolling and/or coating may be done to the coil depending on the end use of the customer’s part.

At Chesterfield, the end use of the customer’s part is the driver of our process.  To ensure our customers get the “right steel” to make the part, we start with the part we obtain from the customer.  The part goes through an intense and thorough examination and assessment in order to spec out the chemical, physical, and surface properties needed.  This entire process is handled by our quality department, as well as considerable collaboration with the producing mill.  Once the specs are determined, the purchasing department orders the steel.

Incoming coils typically weigh 10,000 – 50,000 pounds each.  Once in the Euclid facility, a coil to be processed will be unloaded from the truck and moved with an overhead crane to the respective bay where it will be processed.  A coil to be slit will be loaded onto a mandrel, opened, and threaded through a series of rotating knives.  Prior to running, the knives are set up to slit the coil into strips with tolerances typically holding +/-.005 inches in width.  These same strips are separated and rewound onto an exit mandrel to complete the slitting process.  Once wound, each strip, now a smaller-width coil, is secured with a steel strap around its circumference.  The smaller-width coils are pushed off the mandrel onto a packaging machine where lateral straps are fitted through the inside and outside diameters, sealed, mechanically placed on a skid, weighed and stored as finished goods until they are trucked to the customer.

The other process that takes place at Chesterfield involves taking a wide coil, loading it onto the mandrel of a different type machine.  The original coil width is threaded through a corrective leveler to shape-correct the wide strip and then progresses to a shear that cuts the strip to produce sheets to a predesignated size per the customer’s specification.  These sheets are checked for flatness and digitally checked for length, width, and squareness required by the customer.  The sheets automatically are stacked on a skid so that they end up looking like a big deck of cards.  Once completed, they also are packaged with steel strapping and stored as finished goods until they are trucked to the customer.

Customers have primarily been in the automotive sector.  As a second-tier supplier, Chesterfield sends these coils and sheets to the stampers and roll formers to make the parts that up in domestic and foreign cars and trucks.  The end-use parts may be bearings, air conditioning compressors, bumpers, engine pulleys, impellers, airbags, and transmission parts.  Some non-transportation parts include CO2 cartridges for air guns, cooking range burner bowls, casket parts, etc.

A team of 49 associates produces these thousands of tons of steel each month.  The company has very low turnover, as many of Chesterfield employees have been there for years.  “We may not be perfect, but it is a great place to work,” says Allan Maggied, plant manager.  Tried and true processes that are continuously improved by team members’ participation have sustained the company.  Things change. As we look down 222nd Street, although still the business corridor of Euclid, it isn’t the bustling manufacturing area it used to be.  In the past, Chesterfield had deliveries within a stone’s throw away.  Now, the largest shares are out of town, and even out of state.

Since most employees have been here as long as they have, there is the Chesterfield culture that has evolved throughout the years.  With 70-plus years in the business, we have much to be proud of.  As the Chesterfield family, we certainly have been through thick and thin, and will continue to do so.  Currently, we are facing the challenges of the 232 Steel Tariffs, trucking shortages, finding a maintenance tech, etc.  If there is one thing that we’ve learned, we know only by listening and working with each other will we be able to continuously improve and make our family the desired place to be.  We are proud to say we work at Chesterfield Steel in Euclid, Ohio!

Chesterfield Steel slitters

Get to know HGR’s Lonnie Long

HGR accounting employee Lonnie Long

What is your job title?

I am an accounting assistant.

What are your job responsibilities on a day-to-day basis?

I do the daily cash reconciliation and monthly VISA reconciliation; cut consignment checks; send PayPal invoices for the salespeople; settle checks, credit card transactions, PayPal payments, and wire/debit payments; process and pay vendor/trucking invoices; create payroll bank transactions; sales taxes; sort through mail; and make change for the front desk. Outside of accounting, I sometimes help out in the Shipping Department.

What qualifications are needed to succeed in your role?

Accounting knowledge, time management/organizational skills, efficiency and accuracy, and the ability to communicate and work well with others.

What background or prior work experiences do you bring to the table?

I have an associate’s degree in accounting and a bachelor’s degree in business management, both from Bryant & Stratton College.

How long have you been with HGR, and why?

I have been with HGR for 10 years because it is a good place to work. I like the people here, and I’ve been given several opportunities to grow and reach my full potential.

What amazing things are you doing in your personal life?

I am editing one novel and writing another.

What can you tell us about your family?

My father has worked two full-time jobs for almost as long as I’ve been alive; I share his name and his appearance (uncannily so). My mother raised me and my brother to be decent people, and she always pushed us to be the best that we can be. My younger brother has a doctorate in pharmacy.

What is the most important thing in the world to you/what matters most?

My family. Getting my novels published. Striving to accomplish every goal that I set before myself. Being a good person, doing right by everyone, and making people laugh as often as is possible.

An artist and a carpenter team up to create public art

JP Costello and Erin Guido of So Fun Studio

 

(Q&A with JP Costello and Erin Guido of So Fun Studio)

What services does your business provide?

So Fun Studio is an interactive design collaborative that creates joyful and lighthearted public art and products.

How did you get your training?

So Fun is a collaboration between two artists, Erin Guido and John Paul Costello.

Erin studied printmaking at Indiana University and urban planning at University of Michigan. She is currently a project manager at LAND studio, a public art and public space nonprofit in Cleveland. She is also a mural artist and has multiple works up around town.

John Paul started in the trades with a metal fabrication company and then worked as a carpenter. He now has his own design and fabrication business and works on everything from residential and commercial furniture to more unique jobs, such as a custom bamboo motorcycle seat or a twenty person foosball table. He is a self-trained artist and creates wooden sculptures.

Tell about some interesting projects that you’ve worked on.

We collaborated on an interactive art show at the Akron Art Museum called Please Touch in spring 2016. After we completed that show, we formalized So Fun Studio because we knew we wanted to create more interactive art works together. It made us so happy to watch museum goers have fun touching, changing, and playing with the art work. The world needs more moments of joy!

So Fun Studio Please Touch installation

TODAY I FEEL, a kinetic artwork with wheels that spin freely from one another, is probably the most successful installation from Please Touch. The sculpture is roughly 6’x6’x6′ and made of 15 wheels, each with 30 sections of hand-painted alphabet and punctuation. Users can display their “feelings” by moving the wheels and changing the text. Currently, TODAY I FEEL is on display at the Cleveland Public Library.

So Fun Studio Today I Feel sculpture

 

Since Please Touch, we have participated in gallery shows and created art work for public events. For example, DANCING MACHINE is a full-scale teeter totter with characters attached to gears that “dance” as you teet and tott. It was on display at the Ohio City Street Festival and Gordon Square’s Hip2BeSquare outdoor summer event.

So Fun Studio teeter totter

Most recently, we built I HAVE MANY, a 4’x35′ interactive billboard installed on a building rooftop at 78th Street Studios for the 2018 CAN Triennial, a curated contemporary art festival featuring artists from Northeast Ohio. From the ground, people can pull cords that are connected to one of four indexing gears to change the displayed words. There are 256 different versions of the artwork depending which combination of words in the sentence the user selects.

What materials do you use?

The recent interactive artworks are constructed from Baltic Birch Plywood for the main body, along with wooden gears or indexing pins. We also use metal, plastics, or off-the-shelf materials, like bicycle gears, when necessary for different moving parts. We normally use acrylic paint or exterior house paint for the added graphics, lettering, and illustration.

Do you have employees/collaborators or work alone? 

So Fun Studio is the two of us, although John Paul’s father has majorly helped many times with construction and installation when time is crunched. Our friends also have helped multiple times with painting the pieces. We are lucky to have so much support!

What is the mission of So Fun Studio?

We aim to use art and design to bring moments of joy, humor, and imagination to anyone and everyone!

I understand that you are HGR customers. How did you find out about HGR Industrial Surplus?

Word of mouth from other artists and builders. We remember first walking into the facility and the feeling of excitement, like a kid in a candy store.

What kinds of items have you purchased at HGR Industrial Surplus, and how have you used them?

A few metal carts and a table or two along with miscellaneous little odds and ends that sparked our interest.  We currently are on the hunt for a metal lathe and mill; so, we will be back in soon!

What inspires you?

Erin is inspired by street art, pop-up books, playgrounds, walking around cities, and anything that is colorful and happy. John Paul is inspired by nature, cityscapes, abandoned buildings, Whirligigs, and practically anything else with some sort of motor.

JP Costello catan wall
designed by JP Costello
JP Costello hinge stairs
designed by JP Costello

Q&A with Waterloo Arts Fest Artist-in-Residence Angela Oster

Artist Angela Oster

When did you know you were an artist?

I’ve always loved to draw and make things, but it took a while to consider myself an artist. I think it was after I developed the habit of drawing every day that I had the confidence to call myself an artist.

How did you get your training?

I have a BFA from The Cleveland Institute of Art and took vocational commercial art in high school. I also did a mentorship with Dan Krall, an illustrator and animator. I also practice a lot on my own.

What types of work do you create?

I mostly draw cartoons. My goal is to make them funny, weird, cute and kind. I also make small sculptures based on my drawings. I like to call them delicate monsters and wide eyed weirdies. In art school, I studied installation and performance art; so, I also am interested in interactive, public art. But the running theme is to invoke delight, whether it’s a cute drawing or a playful sculpture.

Angela Oster vampire cartoon

What inspires you?

I’m inspired by everything! Sometimes it’s a vintage greeting card or an old video clip of an animation or an antique broach. I’m a fan of so many artists and so many kinds of art, and it gets all mashed up into my drawings and sculpts. There is an impulse that happens.

What do you do when you are not creating art?

When I’m not creating art, I like to look at art in museums and galleries. I teach at BayArts and work part time at Ohio Citizen Action. I love to spend time with my family and friends, watch movies, swim, and go to flea markets and libraries.

Have you shopped at HGR for your work?

Yes! HGR is like a candy store for artists. There is so much raw material; it’s boundless and inspiring, and it’s affordable!

If so, what have you found and how have you used it?

I found some orange “High Voltage” tape to use in a public sculpture for Waterloo Arts. The tape was a turning point in the evolution of my idea for the sculpture, and that would not have happened without HGR.

How did you get involved as an artist-in-residence with Waterloo Arts Fest?

I have participated as a vendor for many years at the fest. I think it is so unique in that it’s a real neighborhood event. There are a lot of hands-on activities for visitors of all ages. This year, I was invited to do a residency, so I jumped at the chance.

Tell us about the project.

I built an “Orange Removal Machine” — a community sculpture that served as a voter registration booth and also helped gather objects for “A Color Removed” at SPACES Gallery. I built a giant, open structure out of hula hoops and covered it with orange tape. I asked people to bring me any orange objects: clothing, toys, sports equipment, household items, etc. The objects have been cataloged and displayed as part of Michael Rakowitz’s installation at SPACES, during FRONT International.

Angela Oster Orange Removal Machine concept drawingAngela Oster Orange Removal MachineAngela Oster Orange Removal MachineAngela Oster objects for A Color Removed

What’s next?

I’m organizing a pop-up group show at the Osterwitz Gallery located at 15615 Waterloo Road in Cleveland on Sept. 7. I gave 30 artists a “Ting-a-ling Tina” Doll, a tiny doll inside a tiny phone. Each artist can customize the doll, or make a new piece inspired by the doll. It should be a fun show!

Euclid Chamber of Commerce Social Media Workshop

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

On Aug. 15 at 6:30 p.m. at Euclid Public Library, 631 E. 22nd St., Euclid, you can learn to identify the social media tools that will be most effective for your business, how to set up accounts on these platforms and how to manage social media so that it does not rule your working day. Instructor Chic Dickson, founder and owner, C7Branding, which specializes in digital business identity solutions understands that non-profits, social work agencies, and government entities have often used social media purely to market their brand to their potential clients and funders. Chic has combined social media with evidence-based strategies to cultivate client engagement and keep client loyalty longer. Chic has been featured in The Plain Dealer, WKYC, The News-Herald, and various other websites and blogs for her success in utilizing social media to reach audiences from all over the world.

This is a no-cost workshop! You can register here.

Chick Dickson C7Branding

Euclid Chamber of Commerce Coffee Connections: Willoughby Western Lake County Chamber of Commerce

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

SAVE THE DATE! Join the Euclid Chamber of Commerce at The Cabin, 28810 Lakeshore Blvd., Willowick, Ohio, on Aug. 14 from 8:00-9:00 a.m. EST for a presentation from the Willoughby Western Lake County Chamber of Commerce over coffee and networking.

There is no cost to attend.  Membership is not required.

Please register here.

Euclid Chamber of Commerce Marketing Plan Workshop

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

 

On Aug. 14 at 8:30 a.m. at Euclid Public Library, 631 E. 222nd St., Euclid, you can learn how to develop a well-designed marketing plan and learn how it can help you raise awareness of your business, attract more customers and boost sales. Instructor Chic Dickson, founder and owner, C7Branding, which specializes in digital business identity solutions understands that non-profits, social work agencies, and government entities have often used social media purely to market their brand to their potential clients and funders. Chic has combined social media with evidence-based strategies to cultivate client engagement and keep client loyalty longer. Chic has been featured in The Plain Dealer, WKYC, The News-Herald, and various other websites and blogs for her success in utilizing social media to reach audiences from all over the world.

This is a no-cost workshop! You can register here.

Chick Dickson C7Branding

Q&A with Waterloo Arts Fest Artist-in-Residence Susie Underwood

fan ax set design by Susie Underwood for Near West Theater's production of Aida
fan ax set design Near West Theater’s 2018 production of Aida

When did you know you were an artist?

I have always loved making things and coming up with creative narratives. When I was a kid, I’d read fantasy or science fiction novels, and then I would create costumes or props inspired by the stories. That being said, I don’t think I was comfortable calling myself an artist until I had completed some installations with my former art collective, Art Club, around my mid-20s. I felt that I was actually doing something unique and from my own perspective for the first time, and that helped me to feel comfortable calling myself an artist.

How did you get your training?

I went to Ohio State University for art and journalism, got my master’s in art museum education from Antioch University Midwest, and gained a lot of my experience from working with studio and family programs at the Columbus Museum of Art. Much of my knowledge is self-taught. School can only get you so far.

What types of work do you create?

Susie Underwood in costume I like to “try on” many different types of art making, and I’m usually most successful when I combine installation with performance and audience participation. So, instead of having an art show, I might set it up like a garage sale. Or I might perform lounge songs while dressed as an alien, while cracking nerdy jokes and harassing the audience with props. For the Waterloo Arts Fest, I created a “living room” under a tent and painting everything white, so that visitors could decorate my little “home.” I prefer to change the atmosphere and environment from the usual visual art experience, which I find to be pretty boring.

What inspires you?

I love finding new artists on Instagram; there are some amazing artists in Los Angeles, New Orleans and Melbourne right now. Drag queens have really elevated their practice into some of the best contemporary art out there, and they have become a big influence on my performance approach. I am also inspired by the City of Cleveland, the weird history, and the kitsch and beauty that is taken for granted. I love music and science fiction; so, that comes out sometimes.

What are your thoughts on with art therapy?

I am interested in the growing field of art therapy but I’m not actively involved in it. I curated an exhibition at the Columbus Museum of Art which highlighted the different ways that art can be used therapeutically. I was showcasing the field to the general public, who may not be aware of all that happens or the potential of art therapy.

How did you get involved as an artist-in-residence with Waterloo Arts Fest?

I was recommended as a potential artist-in-residence because I am good at creating interactive, participatory experiences and working with the public. My years as a museum educator made me that way.

Tell us about the project.

I set up a 10’ x 10’ tent with living room furniture inside. Everything was be white, even my clothes, so that visitors could paint and decorate my little home. I also had a chandelier they could help create by adding junk from their purses, and a rag rug that they could help weave. It was inspired by my love for rehabbing and decorating my home. I want people to understand that creativity doesn’t just have to take place in an art studio; it should be infused into every aspect of life. Creativity is vital to our survival, and we need it now more than ever. We need leaders who can create new ideas, not just destroy things they don’t like.

What’s next?

I have a potential mural on the horizon, if I can ever finish the design!

Susie Underwood mural for Porco Lounge, Cleveland
mural for Porco Lounge, Cleveland
Susie Underwood's WEB for the Columbus Museum of Art's Wonder Room
WEB for the Columbus Museum of Art’s Wonder Room
Susie Underwood's banners for Near West Theater's 2018 production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame
banners for Near West Theater’s 2018 production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Susie Underwood

Meet a local manufacturer of dental crowns, impants and dentures

Moskey Dental Laboratories

 

Rob Lash , president, Moskey Dental Laboratories(Q&A with Robert Lash, president, Moskey Dental Laboratories)

What is dental restoration?

A dental restoration replaces a tooth or teeth in a patient’s mouth. The dentist makes either an analog or digital impression and sends it to Moskey Dental Laboratories with a prescription for the type of restoration he/she wants.

What is your background? I see that you completed your undergraduate studies at Emory University and law school at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. How did you end up in dental restoration?

Despite my education, my family’s business was our dental lab since my grandfather started it in 1924. When my father’s partners left the business I joined to help him continue.

When, why and who started the business?

The name of my grandfather’s lab was Mutual Dental Lab. Over the years he, my father and uncle acquired other labs and merged with Moskey in the mid-60s. The name was changed to Moskey Mutual, and I dropped Mutual because too many people thought we were an insurance company.

Why did you select your current location?

Our first location was in Midtown at 71st and Euclid, and we were downtown after that until we had to move because we were located on the site of what is now Progressive Field and Quicken Loans Arena. We like Midtown due to the ease of access to the highways and public transportation.

Do patients come directly to you, or do the dentists place an order?

Patients will come to our lab for tough tooth shades and for quick repairs of removable restorations, but only at the direction of their dentist.

What is your favorite part of your job or most interesting moment? 

I know it sounds corny, but giving people their teeth back is very satisfying and important for the patient’s general health. Unfortunately, we don’t often see the results of our work in patients’ mouths, but we appreciate when dentists send us pictures of a happy patient.

What is the greatest challenge in your industry?

Finding trained dental technicians. Last century there were many Eastern European immigrants in Northeast Ohio who were well-trained, and there were many dental technology programs available. Now, as far as I know, there are no such programs in Ohio.

How have things changed in your career, and what does the future of dental laboratories look like?

The future is here, and it’s digital — from the dentist’s office to our lab where we can design almost any restoration with a CAD program, and then manufacture that restoration by an additive (3D printing, laser sintering) process, or subtractive (milling).

digital milling of dentures at Moskey Dental Laboratories
digital milling of dentures at Moskey Dental Laboratories
digital milling of dentures at Moskey Dental Laboratories
digitally milled dentures

Why is restoration so expensive?

What we charge the dentist is not what the dentist charges the patient. With crowns and implants, there is often precious metal involved and expensive implant parts that are highly machined for optimum results. We have no control over the final cost, but I’d say the four years (plus for specialists) of post-graduate education, the yearly continuing education, and the many expenses of running a dental office certainly have a lot do with what the patient may consider an expensive restoration!

How did you know Christopher Palda, the HGR Industrial Surplus customer who put us in touch with you?

He does work for Stone Oven Bakery, which rents space in my building.

Has Christopher repaired or built items for you?

Yes, he’s repaired or attempted to repair numerous pieces of equipment for us.

What do you do when you are not running Moskey? 

Enjoying time with my wife, visiting my three kids who all live out of town, playing guitar in bands, road bicycle riding, sleep!

What inspires you?

The awesome beauty and power of nature.

What is the best advice that you would give to others?

Do something that brings you joy, whether that’s inside or outside of your career.