Ultrasonic Welding Looks to Make Big Noise in the Future

Used Ultrasonic Welder
Ultrasonic Welder

We have all seen a movie where someone’s voice is so high, that it breaks a glass in half, right? The science behind it says that high-pitched or high-frequency sounds have the ability to break materials apart, but that’s not the end of it. You can also use high-frequency vibrations and friction to bond materials together. That’s what Ultrasonic Welding is, in a nutshell.

History of Ultrasonic Welding

Ultrasonic welding was invented in the 1940s and used for bonding thermoplastics.  It wasn’t patented until 1965 when Robert Soloff found out that sound waves would travel around plastic and allow the joint area of the thermoplastics to be welded. The industry was changed even further when he combined a drill press and this ultrasonic welder, to make a new machine that he would pitch to Ideal Toy Co. Plastic toys saw massive growth as well as other industries due to plastics no longer requiring heat for bonding.

How Does It Work?

Have you ever had rug burn? It really hurts, doesn’t it? You can actually feel the heat as your skin grazes the carpet leaving behind a burn. That burn is from the friction. The same way rubbing your hands together warms them up, is the same idea behind ultrasonic welding. Sounds waves cause the two materials to vibrate at insane speeds, causing them to heat up and bond together. That rapid frictional heat is the key to success to bind the materials together. Here is a video of the process.

Why Use It?

There are some advantages to using ultrasonic welding or the traditional methods of welding.

  • Welding occurs at a lower temperature compared to other methods. This means that the manufacturer doesn’t need as much energy to reach the temperatures needed for bonding.
  • The process is significantly faster, often processing in fractions of a second to seconds. Faster than glues and more efficient.
  • A safer process that doesn’t require flammable fuel or open flames. Workers aren’t exposed to the materials and there isn’t a need to store dangerous materials on-site. Although hearing issues may occur if proper safety measures and precautions aren’t taken.
  • It’s cheaper. Given some of the statements above, you can see the cost for this process would be less than that of some traditional methods, which is why this method soared to popularity quickly.

The Future

In 2019, the market size of Ultrasonic Welding Machine is 456.2 million US$ and it will reach 565.3 million US$ in 2025, growing at a CAGR of 3.1% from 2019, according to Downey Magazine. Their article presented the Ultrasonic Welding Machine production, revenue, market share, and growth rate for each key company, and also covers the breakdown data (production, consumption, revenue, and market share) by regions, types, and applications. history breakdown data from 2014 to 2019, and forecast to 2025.

Looking for an Ultrasonic Welder?

HGR is one of the leaders in selling used machinery and surplus supplies. With 12 acres of industrial equipment under one roof, you can believe we also have Ultrasonic Welders available now. Use this link to see what we have in stock. If you don’t see anything now, check back in a week or so. We have hundreds of new items arriving daily, so you never know what will come in next.

Used Packaging Machinery at HGR

Shrink Wrap Machine

Packaging machinery is used throughout all the packaging processes or operations such as cartoning, cleaning, closing, filling, labeling, and others. Different timing mechanisms are used in the packaging machinery which decides the speed of the machinery. These machines can work manually and semi-automatic or automatically. The end-use industries are progressively shifting towards integrated, sophisticated, and standardized equipment to meet with environmental standards and to reduce packaging waste.

Increase in demand for packaging machinery in industries such as healthcare, cosmetics, food & beverage, and other consumer goods, where the packaging has become more essential for marketing. Transportation is a major factor projected to drive the growth of the global market. In addition, the demand for consumable goods in developing countries owing to the rising population is another factor estimated to propel off the global packaging machinery market.

Among the end-user segments, the food & beverage segment is projected to register the highest growth rate in the global market owing to changing consumer preferences and new packaging formats in e-commerce. In addition, the packaging machinery used in the food & beverage industry provide special chemical, physical, and biological protection and tamper resistance to the products. The pharmaceutical segment is anticipated to grow at a significant rate in the global market.

HGR has 12 acres of machinery and a whole aisle of used packaging equipment for you to browse through to see if you can help grow your business without significantly raising your overhead. Some of the more popular items are labelers, staplers, shrink wrappers, sealers, heat tunnels, and more. With more than 250 items in our packaging category, we have a variety of manufacturers like 3M, Titan, Pearson, Auto Bag, and too many more to list.

See if HGR Industrial Surplus can be your one-stop-shop for all of your company or manufacturing needs by visiting our homepage.

Reshoring America’s Jobs

Reshoring America's Jobs

Reshoring America’s Jobs are current buzz words being thrown around and for good reason. It is the practice of transferring your business operation that was overseas and back to the country it was originally located. The new Reshoring Initiative providing $100 million dollars to develop apprenticeship programs, legislation introduced to help close trade deficit, and a Reshoring Initiative president has been appointed to the Department of Commerce Investment Advisory Council. All big steps needed to move this initiative forward.

Back in the 1960s (1) you saw a trend of Offshoring begin within companies, but wasn’t under heavy public scrutiny until the 1970s. The thought process was that Offshoring would grant the companies cheaper labor and lower production costs, not to mention tax breaks and financial incentives. While some of these things may have occurred, it wasn’t without its flaws. Some of the disadvantages were quality control problems, time zone adjustments, language barriers, and effects on jobs where the company was originally based. These issues may have had an effect that led to the new Reshoring Initiative.

The Great Recession of 2008 forced companies to find alternative ways to cut costs by reshoring their businesses to the United States to create jobs for unemployed Americans. Since then, Reshoring has become a political priority with the SelectUSA program being started in 2011 (2) and the urging of major corporations to lead the change by setting the example.

Is your company looking to Reshore or would like some more information about it? Visit http://www.reshorenow.org and see how they can assist your business. They provide various resources like the ones listed on their site below.

The Reshoring Initiative is focused on Reshoring America’s Jobs which is helping companies shift collective thinking from “offshoring is cheaper” to “local reduces the total cost of ownership.” We do this by assisting manufacturers and suppliers in making sourcing decisions by providing valuable tools and resources including:

* Total Cost of Ownership Estimator® — an intuitive online calculator for determining a company’s profit and loss impact of reshoring vs. offshoring
* Case Studies — a collection of reshoring success stories from manufacturers, technology suppliers, and distributors
* Reshoring Library — an online searchable database derived from over 2,900 articles on reshoring
* Webinarsnews items and presentations — archives of past Reshoring Initiative events and articles you can use to inform customers or employees
* Personalized Help evaluating the offshore/reshore sourcing decision

 Other Resources
* Survey data on U.S. consumer preference for Made in America products.
* PowerPoints
* Data
* Economic Development Program
* Skilled Workforce program

 

 

CNC Turning Machines Show Growth Through 2025

CNC Turning Machine Graph

CNC Turning Machines are an important part of the manufacturing process. If you are a machine dealer or own a machine shop of any sort, it is important to keep an eye on the landscape of the business. While no one knows the future, one can look into the past, notice trends, and reasonably set goals that are achievable and sustainable. From a report created by hexaresearch.com they take a look at the upcoming CNC Turning Machine’s projected market value through 2025. Below is a summary. You can see the whole report here.

The US market value in 2016 for CNC Turning Machines was estimated at 7.88 billion USD and has been projected to continue to grow more than 4% from 2017-2025. Automation processes are likely to improve and result in lower human errors that may cause downtime or inefficiency. This increase in productivity should affect growth. There has also been an increase in mass-produced items, so that may attribute and fuel the industry’s growth.

The Internet of Things (IoT) will most likely lead to software being developed that allow CNC machines to be more compatible with PCs and smart devices. This change could eliminate the need for multiple positions or supervisors, which decreases the workforce, but gains profits for the company. With greater connectivity, faster and more efficient outcomes should be the result.

To look deeper at a few different segments within CNC Machining, lathes are expected to maintain their position on top of the hierarchy. Due to being able to handle complex operations, the versatility will make for higher demand in the 2025 forecast period. Milling machines should grow at a faster pace with the increase in the use of Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) to help improve accuracy and efficiency.

Overall, the world of CNC machining is approaching a very intriguing time and boom in technology. Today’s machines are becoming smarter, faster, and more efficient by the day, and with so many companies out competing for their market share, I don’t expect the growth or innovations to stop any time soon.

When it comes to Used CNC machines, however, look no further than HGR Industrial Surplus. When those companies upgrade their equipment to new machines, they have to do something with their old machinery. They aren’t going to throw it out, and scrapping it involves too many hands and too much time. So what do they do with it? They sell it to HGR Industrial Surplus and maximize their Return on Investment (ROI). Why would you want old machinery when everything is trendy towards new technology? Cost. Not everyone is a major corporation that can follow the current technology trend at the breakneck speeds it moves at. But their need for new technology is your gain. If the machines fit your applications, you can save thousands by using HGR as your resource for used machinery. You may have an older machine that needs to keep running and you’re having a hard time finding parts. HGR may have that machine. Why not have a salvage machine to pilfer parts from when needed? The uses are endless. So don’t waste time and start shopping for your future now! hgrinc.com

 

Robots on the Rise at HGR

HGR has robots and robot arms galore. Small robotic arms for intricate details and giant robotic arms with attachments to make good ole’ Ripley jealous. Not an Aliens fan, it’s ok. You don’t have to be to see that HGR can save you money by offering you used machinery as an option.

For decades human arms did the majority of factory work, but now robotic arms are doing some of the same jobs, but at a higher efficiency rate. In a lot of ways, they work like a human arm would and are usually made up of 4-6 joints for movement. The components are designed to mimic the wrist, forearm, elbow, and shoulder. They are able to work at a higher speed and do things that human arms would not be able to with great precision and accuracy.

Robotic arms have a few different applications they are used for. Some arms have welding attachments on them and sit on a production line all day. For safety reasons, robotic arms have been deployed for material removal in areas and with matter that may be toxic to humans. Another application would be in the material handling field.

HGR has many of these robots available here and from different manufacturers like Fanuc, ABB, Hirata, and more.

Here are a few Robots HGR currently have in stock.

Fanuc R-2000iB/210F

$6,999

Fanuc Robot at HGR
Fanuc Robot R-2000iB/210F at HGR

See the item here –

 https://hgrinc.com/productDetail/Robots/Used-Fanuc-Robot/07190470074/

This is a Fanuc R-2000iB/210F that is available at HGR Industrial Surplus. It is a robot that is floor-mounted and can function under a very high payload. The typical applications it is used for are material handling, welding, dispensing, and removal of materials. This is one of the slimmer models that allow it to be used in tight spaces, but don’t be fooled by the looks. This arm can do its job.



ABB Robot IRB 2400

$5,999

ABB IRB 2400 Robot at HGR
ABB IRB 2400 Robot at HGR

https://hgrinc.com/productDetail/Robots/Used-Abb-Robot/09190740002/

The ABB IRB 2400 has a wide variety of applications it is used for around the world. Some of those are MIG welding, pick and place, woodworking, and more. It is a 6-Axis industrial robot that was designed specifically for industries that use flexible robot-based automation.


Fanuc S-430iF

$5,999

Fanuc S-430iF at HGR
Fanuc S-430iF at HGR

https://hgrinc.com/productDetail/Robots/Used-Fanuc-Robot/09191270002/

Automotive manufacturing was the aim for this model from Fanuc. It does a great job of spot welding as well as material handling operations. This model is also known for its’ flexibility by utilizing the J-2 axis and allowing the robot to reach over its head and behind it. This raises the bar for usage once optimized to your application.


See more in our Robot Category by using the link below. HGR has over 15 thousand items in stock so make sure you browse our website if you don’t find something in our robot category. With 12 acres of industrial surplus, you never can be too sure of what you might find.

https://hgrinc.com/surplus/robots/?all=0&view=grid&aisle=&from=&to=&markdowns=0&newarrivals=0&sort=p-htl&kw=&per_page=96&min_price=&max_price=&pn=3&search_type&last_chance&slug=

3 Manufacturing Trends to Pay Attention To

3 Manufacturing Trends to Pay Attention To

When it comes to trends, there are so few to really pay attention to. Everyone is fighting for your attention and money and claiming they have the next big thing. They all promise to take your company or performance to the next level and make you rise above the competition. Most of these trends are marketing ploys to line the pockets of corporations, and have little to no real-world use. Every now and then, however, a few of them just seem to make a lot of sense. Some trends not only have real-world use, but the practicality of them makes it seem like a sure-fire, can’t-miss trend to jump on while it is early. Here are a few trends you might want to keep an eye on if you are in the manufacturing sector. 

  1. Smart Manufacturing – Industry 4.0 has provided an opportunity to manufacturers to use advanced manufacturing capabilities combined with informative technology to optimize the lifecycle of the product. Industry 4.0 is a subset of the fourth industrial revolution that pertains to smart machines or cities. The first revolution was mechanizing through water and steam power, which led to the second revolution of mass assembly using electricity. The third revolution involved adopting computers and automation, but the fourth expounds upon that idea by not only automation, but learning-based systems that optimize themselves to perform at high efficiency. The difficulty lies in finding a way to utilize this to maximize your business and production. 
  2. Augmented Reality – While this concept isn’t new, the ways it is being used are, even though it is still in the infancy stage when it comes to manufacturing. The uses could be for training people on machinery or how to repair them. Some places use them for data management by placing you in a visual world of information to quickly comprehend and grab as needed. Imagine being able to train someone on a machine and not have that machine out of commission or performing slower than normal due to training, or imagine scrolling through data with a flick of the wrist as the field fly by your face. The possibilities are endless. 
  3. Additive Manufacturing – Basically 3D printing. Imagine being able to stock 30% more inventory by carrying 0% of replacement parts for it! Instead you have stored media that will be used to print the replacement part when it is needed. The days of obsolete parts are gone and stocking them for years after, are long gone. While this hasn’t taken over yet, the implications of how this could help local, or large-scale manufacturers are endless. What if a machine goes down and you need a part today to fix it? You will be able to just print it. This is an exciting new trend to embrace and be on the cutting edge of. Smart businesses are early adopters to the tech that makes the most sense for their business. 

In closing, there are many ways for you to increase efficiency and production within your company. Take your time to research them and look forward to where your business is going, not to where it has been.

5 Thoughts Before Buying Used Equipment

5 Thoughts Before Buying Used Machinery

Buying used machinery can be an excellent way to grow your business and stay within budget. You could be searching for high-end CNC equipment or a consumer grade drill press, and the chances are, you would save money buying used. The first part of buying used is knowing where to look. Obviously, I would recommend HGR Industrial Surplus given the large inventory and variety of equipment. In the end, wherever you choose, there a few things to keep in mind when buying used machinery. 

  1. Reasoning – What are you looking for in a used machine? Do you want to get a great deal on a working machine without any issues that runs for life without a need for maintenance? Flip another quarter in the wishing well, and throw me in one too while you’re at it. The truth is, used machinery doesn’t come with all of those guarantees and often needs some sort of work done to it before it is in optimal working condition. So, if you have the resources or knowledge to do so, buying used may be an option for you. Do you need to see it in working condition before you buy it? Maybe try an auction on our homepage.  
  2. Financing – Not all machinery dealers offer financing and banks may be hesitant to loan money for used machinery. You may have to come out of pocket for the full cost of the machine and the repairs. While this will most likely benefit you in the long run, you have to have the resources available before making that decision. 
  3. Component Usage Wear – It is important to know what you are looking and where to look when buying a used machine. You may use one of these machines daily and know exactly where to look. For the rest of us, we aren’t hopeless. Luckily smart phones have given us the ability to search the make and model and which components wear out or are frequently damaged. While the damage may not be a deal breaker, it may give you leverage on the price when haggling, so make sure to take a quick search while inspecting.  
  4. Know the Value – Every company is out to make money, so don’t be surprised if the prices aren’t rock bottom steals. These companies have to purchase the machines and then have them shipped into a facility to sit and take up floor space waiting to be sold. There is a cost that builds with each machine. With that said, a little research can give you some buying power by knowing what the machine is worth. It is hard to argue prices, if it is at market value. Knowing what the machine is worth will ensure you don’t overpay and get a fair deal. 
  5. Kill the Deal – Keep in mind that when you go to see a machine in person, you may see things you didn’t in the photos, so make sure you can have someone inspect it, if possible. That person, or yourself, should have “Deal Killers” in mind.  Things that you have decided will detour you from this purchase. It may be specific damage you see, overall condition, storage condition, or a complex repair that is needed. The inner voice in your head says it’s a good deal and I can fix this, but will you ever do it? Know when to say when and decide the tipping point to when this machine is no longer a value. 

Interested in used machinery? See our new arrivals here!

Maybe an auction? Take a look at a few auctions HGR is currently marketing. 

8-14-19 Automotive Stamping Facility Auction

 

By Joseph Powell

5 Reasons to Buy Used Equipment from an Auction

Auctions at HGR
We already know who has the largest industrial surplus showroom in the galaxy, but did you know that HGR Industrial Surplus partners up with Cincinnati Industrial Auctioneers to market auctions? These auctions are great opportunities to get working machinery to help support your current business with little to no downtime. Do you want 5 more reasons to purchase machinery from an auction? Consider this list the next time you are ready to purchase equipment.

1.Industry Specific– The majority of auctions are very specific in what the have to offer. While they offer variety in brands, makes and models, they may also have those specialty items only someone in your industry may need. There may be a lathe, drill press, or mill set up with your business in mind. This is a great opportunity to expand your business and grow at a lower cost.
2. Testing the Machine – Reputable auction companies allow potential buyers to inspect the machinery prior to being auctioned. This machinery is typically in current working environment and under power, allowing buyers to see the working condition of the item. This will be valuable information to have before you place your bid, and it eases the tension on bidding on the item, given that you have seen it in working condition. Since you are getting this piece of equipment directly from the user, it most likely will have some maintenance records with it to give you insight into the machines history.
3. Easy to Bid – Maybe the idea of fighting in a room full of people waving your paddle around, while an auctioneer rattles off numbers at an insane speed seems a bit intimidating. I agree, but most auctions currently allow you to bid online and save yourself from being inside of the scrum. After you see the equipment and inspect it, you can sit at home with a cup of coffee in one hand and your dog curled up at your feet while you bid away effortlessly.
4. Titled Equipment – When you make a large purchase like machinery, getting a title grants you the safety needed to make the purchase without question. This is one of the benefits from purchasing the machinery directly from the user.
5. Financing – Not all auctions offer financing, but those that do understand machinery and the true value of it. A bank may not understand the cost of used machinery or the value and is less likely to provide a loan for it. Auction companies that offer financing will allow you to grow your business without emptying the accounts to do so.

Take a look at a few auctions HGR is currently marketing.

8-7-19 Coil Springs Manufacturer
8-14-19 Automotive Stamping Facility Auction

Do you have any interest in auctioning off your surplus equipment and supplies? Make sure you contact JMiller@hgrinc.com to see if an auction would be something of interest to you or your businees.

courtesy of Joseph Powell

Get to Know HGR’s Kyle Strader

HGR Industrial Surplus' Kyle Strader

What is your job title?

Inbound logistics agent

What do you do/what are your job responsibilities on a day-to-day basis?

Deonte Matthews and I schedule all inbound freight to be inventoried here in Euclid, whether it be consignment or purchased.

What qualifications are needed to succeed in your role?

Attention to detail is very important because we need to confirm dimensions, times, addresses, weights, names, trailer types, carriers, rates, etc. Confidence is also important, because most of our day is spent negotiating. Patience and the ability to adapt to change, because a pickup can go very poorly very quickly. And of course integrity, accountability, and communication. Without those three things, you may as well stay home.

What background or prior work experiences do you bring to the table that help you do your job?

I worked at UPS for 10 years in various roles; so, that experience has certainly helped me make the transition into Logistics at HGR.

How long have you been with HGR, and why?

I started in July 2017. Honestly, at first, I took the job just to have a job, instead of the first one I’d gotten after moving from UPS in Louisville, Kentucky, was as a chemical incineration plant operator, and it was awful and dangerous. But then I fell in love with HGR and all the people here and what we do, and the feeling feels mutual (at least in my head); so, it was one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life.

What amazing things are you doing in your personal life?

I have written two fantasy novels titled Glimpsing Infinity and Touching Infinity (set in Cleveland, actually, so read them!) and I am currently editing the third in the series, which is titled Embracing Infinity. And I’ve also converted the first into a screenplay, which I am shopping around.

What can you tell us about your family?

My wife, Johanna, and I have been married for seven years, and we have two amazing boys, ages 3 (Atlas) and 5 (Odin).

What is the most important thing in the world to you/what matters most?

The happiness of those around me.

Bitesize Business Workshop: Design Thinking

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

Join the Euclid Chamber of Commerce at Moore Counseling & Mediation Services , 22639 Euclid Ave., Euclid, Ohio, on Dec. 13 from 8:30-10 a.m. for an educational workshop presented by Matthew Selker.

There is no cost to attend.  Membership is not required.

Please contact Jasmine Poston at 216.404.1900 or jposton@moorecounseling.com to register.

HGR Industrial Surplus’ Thanksgiving 2018 hours

HGR Industrial Surplus Thanksgiving hours

Here are our holiday hours so that you can plan your visit or pickup. For the week of Thanksgiving, we will be open for normal business hours from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. We are closed on Thursday to observe Thanksgiving with our families. We will re-open for shorter Black Friday hours on Nov. 23 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The following week, we resume our normal hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Enjoy celebrating your holiday and all the people and things for which you are grateful!

Get to Know HGR’s Ludie Toles

HGR's Ludie Toles
(l to r) Susan and Ludie

What is your job title?

I am a marketing administrator.

What are your job responsibilities on a day-to-day basis?

I call on manufacturing companies to talk to them about HGR buying their surplus equipment. If they have surplus, I then enter the information I gathered into our customer relationship management (CRM) system as a lead and set an appointment for the buyer to view the equipment and put in a bid if we are interested.

What qualifications are needed to succeed in your role?

It is a must to have good phone etiquette, as well as computer skills and great customer service skills. We have about 5 seconds to build a rapport with the receptionist or administrative assistant, which is so important as they hold the power as a gatekeeper to the people with whom we need to speak.

What background or prior work experiences do you bring to the table?

For the most part of 30 years of my life, I was in the “people” business. I worked in ministry and nonprofit organizations throughout the U.S., Mexico, Europe and Africa. The people skills I learned while working with many different cultures have been invaluable in my work life. I worked at a call center for two years before I came to HGR, which gave me the phone and computer skills I needed to slip right into my job.

How long have you been with HGR, and why?

It has been 2 1/2 years since joining the HGR team, and I absolutely love it! I was looking for a company with longevity and a moral compass and feel like I have found it.

What amazing things are you doing in your personal life?

One of my passions is landscaping, which I did on a professional level at one point. My wife, Susan, and I work year round on our yard with great satisfaction. I am also an avid “Rock Hound.” I go rock and crystal hunting, as well as collecting, cutting and polishing them. I have recently been elected to serve as a board member for the Austin Gem & Mineral Society which has been a 501(c)(3) for 60 years. I count it a great honor to be a part of this organization!

What can you tell us about your family?

Both of my parents are deceased, and I am the youngest of five children (and I’m old). My two sisters and two brothers live in Colorado, Montana and Texas. I have been blessed with a wonderful companion, and we have been together for 13 years. Susan has two grown daughters that we enjoy when we are able to get together. We also have two sweet Poodles that we love dearly — Tilly & Macy.

What is the most important thing in the world to you/what matters most?

My wife, Susan, is the greatest treasure that I have been blessed with. While I traveled for so many years, I had accepted I would be single for the rest of my life, which was fine in my line of work.  So, what a great gift when Susan walked into my life. I cherish every day with her and love when we are able to spend time with our family and friends who are like family.

HGR Industrial Surplus' Ludie Toles poodles

Self-labeled “design scientist” uses surplus to build chopper

Krager bike

(photo courtesy of Michael Lichter Photography)

As a child, Josh Krager of Eye Spy Designs was obsessed with finding out how things worked. He not only disassembled small machinery items, he even put them back together. As a teen, He enjoyed reading parts and tool catalogs when not working at a small engine repair shop. Josh befriended a welder who taught him the trade, and Josh perfected his skill. He is an engineer, welder and fabricator by trade but a Mad Scientist by nature who envisions one-of-a-kind designs by using imagination, engineering and vintage finds to create artistic and useful inventions. He says, “I always look at what something can do, not what it does. Most of my inspiration comes from just thinking that I can do it a better or a different way.”

He has taken a Dodge Durango daily driver and turned it into a 10-wheeled mud truck on a one-ton chassis, built National Hot Rod Association drag car and drag bike chassis from scratch, and the build list goes on and on until we get to his most recent and fantastic creation.

It all started in March 2014, while cleaning his 6,000-square-foot shop. He stood looking at a motor, housed 15 feet up on pallet racking and mixed in with mud truck parts. This wasn’t just any motor. It was a 1968 Mercedes 2.1L diesel power plant with 23,000 actual kilometers. He pulled it down and placed it on his workbench where it sat for four weeks.

He started to think, “What can I do with this engine?” Friends would come over and ask, “What are you going to do with that engine?” After hearing the same question over and over, just to shut his friends up, he said he was going to build a motorcycle. Well, that shut them up, except for one longtime friend. He bet Josh that he couldn’t build a bike with that engine and finish the project for Geneva-On-The-Lake’s, Sept. 3, 2014 Thunder on the Strip Bike Rally. Lesson learned? Don’t bet against Josh. You will lose.

For tech geeks, makers, engineers and other design scientists, here are the specs:

Frame: Fifteen giant ironworker wrenches and round tubing

Front wheel: a Harley Davidson Road King spoked wheel and tire

Rear wheel: a Harley Davidson Reproduction Pie Crust Drag slick

(He fabricated the forks in a girder style that uses two air shocks to raise and lower the front with an air compressor mounted under the seat. The rear end is rigid; so, to maximize ride comfort, a suspension was used under the seat.)

Transmission: Along with the engine came the original ’68 Mercedes manual, four-speed transmission with reverse coupled to an industrial-style, right angle, 1:1 ratio gear box linked with a #50 chain.

Cooling system: Honda Aspencade with electric fan and Ford F350 heater core.

Overflow for the cooling system: a vintage brass fire extinguisher

Front brake: stock Harley Davidson

Rear brake: stock Harley Davidson disc brake

(Braided stainless brake lines tied it all together.)

Clutch: Honda Goldwing master cylinder, Toyota Land Cruiser slave cylinder and stock Mercedes single disc with a nickel copper clutch line

Electrical system: 60-amp screw-in house fuse with vintage cloth-covered wiring leading to vintage knife switches for headlamp, turn signals and air system controls

Front turn signals: 1930’s glass doorknobs

Rear brake and turn signals: vintage Power Pole insulators. All are LED illuminated.

Fuel tank: U.S. military Jerry can that is secured with a manure spreader chain

Fuel lines: custom-formed nickel-copper tubing

Foot boards: vintage 1950’s water skis

Horn and cheesy siren: donated by his best friend

Rear fender: inverted 1950 Ford 8N tractor fenders

Front fender: old-school posthole digger

Chin fairing: an old cultivator plow blade

Handle bars: right-angle ironworker spud wrenches

Rearview mirror: Moon Eyes Peep Mirror

Saddle: vintage horse saddle

Rear rack: an old iron fence

Where did he get all the “stuff” to make this fabulous creation? Garage and barn sales, auctions, antique stores, picking his friends’ and family members’ junk piles, donations left at the shop door, eBay, Craigslist, swap meets, and HGR Industrial Surplus’ showroom. Krager says, “I discovered HGR years ago when I used to shop at a competitor and HGR’s prices were much better. I have been shopping at HGR since the day they opened their doors. I have purchased everything from office furniture to surface grinders and milling machines. I even bought a very large off-road crane. The bike does have some electrical items and a few driveline pieces that I purchased from HGR. I am currently working on another bike similar to this one and three Rat Rod semis for which we’ve already purchased a few items for from HGR.”

The bike took slightly more than four months but less than 250 hours to build, weighs 1,312 pounds, can cruise up to 55 mph and gets 40 mpg. It is a street-legal, titled Ohio motor vehicle. If you see Josh out on the road, make sure to give him a thumbs up.

Community development corporations serve Collinwood

Beachland Ballroom

Collinwood originally was a village within Euclid Township, but it was annexed by the City of Cleveland in 1910. The neighborhood was built so manufacturing and railroad workers could walk home. Now, there are 17,000 people living in North Collinwood with 220 businesses, 195 of which are locally owned.

So, where does a community development corporation (CDC) come into the picture, and what role does it play? A CDC is a not-for-profit organization that promotes and supports community development through community programs, housing and real estate development, and small business support.

Collinwood is lucky enough to have two CDCs serving the neighborhood: Northeast Shores Development Corporation in North Collinwood and Collinwood-Nottingham Development Corporation serving South Collinwood.

Northeast Shores Development Corporation serves North Collinwood, the primarily residential area between East 140rd Street to the west, East 185th Street to the northeast, Lake Erie to the north, the Collinwood Railroad Yards and tracks to the south. A few facts about North Collinwood:

  • In the Waterloo Arts District, there was a 45-percent vacancy a few years ago with only four vacancies now due in large part to the Welcome to Collinwood initiative.
  • There’s a new effort to attract makers to East 185th through the Made in Collinwood initiative being unveiled in 2016 (stay tuned for further information). The CDC currently is interviewing 44 makers in the area and will do a public presentation of the interview report results in the first quarter.
  • There are 20-25 makers currently on East 185th Street, including a salsa producer, a soap maker, a vintner, an audio engineering production company, a hat maker, a dressmaker, an awards and trophies company, a newspaper publisher, and a digital designer.
  • A new video and music production facility is being built in the former LaSalle Theater with a scheduled early 2016 groundbreaking.
  • The CDC has a desire to connect makers with manufacturing facilities who can manufacture or package the items being created by the makers or for job opportunities for skilled production people.
  • Northeast Shores is funded through taxes, real estate transactions and philanthropy.

Collinwood-Nottingham Development Corporation serves South Collinwood, the primarily industrial area between East 134th Street on the west, Euclid Creek to the east, the Collinwood Railroad Yards and tracks to the north, and Woodworth Avenue to the southwest and Roseland Avenue to the Southeast.

 

Section 179 signed into law: tax break for buying equipment

32420632_sAccording to the Machinery Dealers National Association, on Friday, Dec. 18, President Obama signed the $1.8 Spending and Tax Bill into law.  Earlier on Friday, the Senate gave final congressional approval to the bill, which includes nearly $700 billion in tax breaks.

The new permanent Section 179 expensing limit allows a business to take a current year deduction of the full purchase amount up to $500,000 for assets under $2 million.

Example Savings*

Original Equipment Cost:                  $500,000

New Potential Tax Savings:               $175,000

Final Equipment Cost:                       $325,000

Cash Savings on

Equipment Purchase:                        $175,000

*Assuming a 35% tax qualifying purchase

This information does not constitute tax advice, please check with your tax advisor on how this applies to your business.

HGR creating manufacturing resource center

Word CloudIn partnership with Manufacturing Advocacy & Growth Network (MAGNET), HGR is building the materials to create a manufacturing resource center inside of its customer lounge. The center will house pamphlets, handouts, books and periodicals that provide information about educational and manufacturing opportunities, as well as information about MAGNET’s services and programming. HGR also will create an online center with links to additional resources.

Some of the organizations that will have information available in the center include: Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International; National Association of Manufacturers; the five Ohio regional representatives of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MAGNET, TechSolve, CIFT, PolymerOhio, APEG and FastLane); local colleges and universities with industrial, technical and manufacturing courses and programs; Ingenuity Cleveland and the Nickel Plate Historical & Technical Society.

Currently, HGR is in the information gathering and solicitation phase. If you or your organization have information relevant to science, technology, engineering, arts and manufacturing (STEAM) educational opportunities/organizations, please contact Gina Tabasso, marketing communications specialist, at gtabasso@hgrinc.com.

Once the resource center is up and running, HGR will make an announcement so that you can stop by to peruse the materials.

Sponsorship/partnership further manufacturing in Ohio

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HGR loves to partner with other organizations, as well as provide sponsorship, to promote manufacturing in Ohio. This year, we have had the opportunity to work with three groups of folks doing amazing things to stimulate the growth of the area and enhance the life of its residents.

Euclid HS Robotics Team

First, the company worked with Bob Torrelli, Euclid High School Science Department chair and physics teacher, and his six-student robotics team to prep for its Apr. 25 Alliance for Working Together (AWT) RoboBot Competition as part of the science, technology, engineering, arts and technology (STEAM) initiative. AWT is a coalition of more than 75 local companies that encourage youth to consider jobs in manufacturing. This year, 35 high schools participated. The team worked for more than six months to create an indestructible, remote-controlled battle robot made from a 15-pound aluminum frame with three motors, heat-treated steel blades and Lexan armor. Its robot faced off in battle with the robots of the other high school teams. Euclid made it to the fourth round of competition, tying for ninth place out of 35 and won the award for best sportsmanship. Several working sessions with breakfast were held at HGR’s office at 20001 Euclid Avenue. The company offered design tips and provided materials and equipment. Members of the team and Torelli will be at HGR’s Oct. 1 dedication ceremony and sale to show off their robot and answer questions, as well as to be recognized by HGR for its efforts. The 2016 team is beginning to organize. Stay tuned for a future blog post on its progress.

Next up, HGR is sponsoring the Sept. 30 [M]Power Manufacturing Assembly put on by The Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, aka MAGNET, at the John S. Knight Center in Akron, Ohio. The event’s purpose is to address the “challenges of today’s changing manufacturing landscape. “The event will explore how attendees can maintain their competitive advantage, tackling essential issues of workforce development, ideation strategy, digital marketing optimization, and operations management,” states MAGNET’s website. This year’s keynote speaker is Sean Stack, CEO of Aleris. HGR has purchased a table for 10 and will have a display table to distribute information. In addition, we partnered with MAGNET to create a manufacturing resource center inside of HGR’s customer lounge. The center will house pamphlets, handouts, books and periodicals that provide information about manufacturing opportunities, as well as information about MAGNET’s services and programming. HGR also will create an online center with links to additional resources.

Last but not least, HGR is sponsoring Ingenuity Cleveland’s eleventh-annual Ingenuity Festival on Oct. 2-4; this year, it’s being held at Voinovich Park. This festival of creativity and innovation celebrates art, music, technology and the maker’s movement. We will have a table at the event and host information on Ingenuity Cleveland in our new resource center. HGR also provided monetary and in-kind contributions for the Iron Architect event, a competition where four teams compete to create a unique seating environment within the festival grounds using an array of materials, $200 at Home Depot and a “secret ingredient” that will be selected from the plethora of items available at HGR’s showroom.

The 200-year history of HGR’s site: From farm to wartime plant to GM plant to HGR Industrial Surplus

Nickel Plate Road

(Photo courtesy of Belt Magazine (http://beltmag.com/train-dreams/)

In anticipation of HGR’s Oct. 1 dedication of its recently purchased building as “Nickel Plate Station,” we wanted to take you on a walk down memory lane to the history of the site from the 1800s to the present day.

Logan Family Farm

  • In the 1800s, the Logan Family farmed 68 acres of land along Euclid Avenue in the Village of Euclid then sold the land to a realty company in 1912.
  • 1912-1926: The realty company and the Village fought over the land’s usage as commercial versus residential, respectively. In 1926, the Supreme Court found in favor of the Village as the landmark case that enabled fledgling zoning laws.
  • 1942-1945: In spite of the residential ruling, The Defense Plant Corporation, part of the U.S. government, built then leased a wartime plant to Cleveland Pneumatic Aerol to manufacture landing gear and rocket shells for the WWII effort.
  • 1945: The war ended, and the land became vacant.
  • 1946: The structure housed Cleveland Ordinance District offices, surplus goods and federal government offices.
  • 1947: Ferguson Tractor bought the property with the intent to create a tractor factory, but that plan never came to fruition; so, the land was sold to The Fisher Body Division of General Motors.
  • 1948: Fisher Body began manufacturing bodies for delivery trucks and Chevy and Oldsmobile station wagons then transporting them for assembly via a rail loading bay inside the building that was a stopping point for The Nickel Plate Road, a rail line that connected New York, Chicago and St. Louis since 1881.

Body Manufacture

  • 1958: 100,000 units were produced by 2,900 employees, including bodies for the El Camino.
  • 1960: Bodies for convertibles were added to the line.
  • 1965: The Euclid plant became the sole producer for two muscle cars, the Oldsmobile Toronado and Buick Riviera.
  • 1970: The cost of manufacturing auto bodies and transporting them to final assembly plants became too expensive. GM stopped production and retooled the plant into a sewing center to make interior trim and upholstery.
  • 1970-1980: Labor disputes and strikes took place.
  • 1972: The plant began to make 100,000 units of GM’s first airbag system for high-end 1974-1976 cars, but stopped when only 10,000 were sold in three years.
  • 1982: GM planned to close the plant but UAW workers nationwide negotiated concessions to save the plant, where it continued to make seat covers, door panels, sun shades and other interior parts.
  • 1986: The plant received a contract to make boat seats and cushions for Sea Ray Boats.
  • 1993: GM closed the plant.
  • 1996: GM sold the property to a development company.
  • 1998: HGR Industrial Surplus moved into a portion of the building to realize the owner’s vision of an ongoing industrial garage sale.
  • 2014: HGR purchased the entire 900,000-square-foot building and property and began improvements.
  • Oct. 1, 2015: HGR officially dedicates the property and facility, including tenant space, as “Nickel Plate Station.”

HGR Entrance

 

What’s in the future for HGR, Nickel Plate Station and the City of Euclid? Stay tuned!

Used Geka HYD55 Hydraulic Iron Worker

 

The Geka HYD55 Hydraulic Iron Worker features two hydraulic cylinders with two simultaneous work stations and five total work stations. This item has a 22″ x 25″ bed and two foot switches and 65,000 PSI.

A hydraulic ironworker can be used for punching, shearing, notching, bending and other metal fabrication functions. Ironworkers save time, increase productivity, eliminate waste and create clean smooth cuts and holes. Accessories are available to fabricate rod and square stock, sheet metal and pipe.

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“The Untouchables” Tie for Ninth at RoboBots Competition

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A team Euclid High School students, under the direction of Bob Torrelli, began preparing for the AWT RoboBots competition months ago, and their work paid off with two wins at the battle robots tournament held Saturday, April 25 at Lakeland Community College.

Check out videos of The Untouchables.

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Sponsored by HGR Industrial Surplus and SC Industries, The Untouchables claimed an opening round win over The Gang for Good. In the next round, The Untouchables claimed a decision over The Vikinators.

Next up was a meeting with Dreadnaught, the team that would eventually claim the tournament championship. The Untouchables fell short in that match, and slipped into the consolation bracket to take on Polaris. Again, The Untouchables came up short against on of the tournament’s top teams, ending their run with a 2-2 record and tied for ninth place in the tournament.

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HGR, Team Euclid Partner for RoboBots Showdown

The sparks will fly when area high school students square off in the 2015 RoboBots Competition Saturday, April 25 at Lakeland Community College.

Team Euclid, made up of Euclid High School students and sponsored by HGR Industrial Surplus, is one of the teams preparing to put its 15-pound remote control battle robot into the arena.

RoboBots is a program of the Alliance for Working Together, a Cleveland area group of companies focused on advancing manufacturing through training and education, outreach and strategic partnerships and grants.

RoboBots teams began preparing their battle bots back in December. Team Euclid visited HGR and picked up a few items to add to their battle bot. Over the past few months, students have been able to enjoy hands-on experience in manufacturing, working alongside engineers and machinists to create a winning battle robot.

For more information on RoboBots, take a look at the video from the 2014 competition.

HGR Announces Building Purchase, Plans Major Renovations

HGR recently finalized the purchase through the Cuyahoga County Land bank. Throughout the past 2 years the ownership of the property has been in turmoil. While the future of the property was in question, HGR reviewed other Cleveland and surrounding counties for a future home for the thousands of tons of used industrial equipment. However, remaining in place at their original location was always the preferred option for HGR’s leadership team.

“We considered relocating our business,” said Brian Krueger, HGR’s CEO. “We weren’t certain how the sale of the building would go, and we had to be prepared to find a new location.

“But from the start, we knew that we wanted to keep HGR here. We’ve been here for 16 years, so we have a lot invested in this location. Now, we can take our commitment to the building and Euclid to the next level.”

HGR is prepared to invest more than 10 million dollars in redevelopment of the building and property. The redevelopment will allow HGR continued expansion and create space for other new tenants. This will result in job creation and preservation, income to the city and county and preserve a historic landmark.

The Euclid Sports Plant is a tenant that occupies about 60,000 square feet of the building. The Sports Plant is an indoor sports facility serving Euclid and the surrounding communities. It has four basketball and/or six volleyball courts, with numerous leagues that play as well as individuals that rent out the courts. The Sports Plant has a full-service weight room and a 24,000 square foot baseball training area with cages and turf, with individual training and lessons available.

Once the repairs, updates, and renovations are made to the property, HGR will then decide what will be done with the rest of the property. Potential options include HGR taking more space or seeking a tenant for the remaining 380,000 square feet.

Krueger states, “HGR has grown in sales 18% this year, and we believe we will continue this growth in the future. This available space will allow for further growth for years to come, which is exciting to the company and community. If growth continues, I foresee HGR having over 150 employs, with 120 of them working out of the Euclid facility. Including HGR’s employees, customers, and drivers, there are over 300 visitors coming to the location daily.

“HGR is excited about the future of the building and giving its new long term home a fresh look.”

About the Building:

The building at 20001 Euclid Avenue was originally built in 1943 to produce aircraft parts during World War II. After the war, it was purchased by Fisher Body and made bodies for General Motors cars. In the 1970’s, the plant was converted to produce interior trip and upholstery for GM cars. In the 1980’s, the facility also began making parts for Sea Ray Boats. In 1993, production was halted and GM closed the building. At its peak in 1955, the plant had 2,958 employees. (http://ech.case.edu/ech-cgi/article.pl?id=FBDOGMC).

The building sits on a little over 66 acres, with 966,000 square foot of building space.

HGR Welcomes International Customers to Euclid Showroom

HGR Industrial Surplus has customers from all around the world that buy online. But HGR is always excited when an international customer shops in-store at the Euclid, Ohio showroom.

One particular customer, Miguel Gonzalez, recently flew in from Peru, unannounced, to visit the 12-acre showroom. Gonzalez works for Talleres Emmanuel and traveled to Euclid for a two-day shopping trip. During his visit, Miguel arranged for the shipping of a 40-foot container to Peru, and he purchased vertical mill and other small machine tools to send back to South America.

Miguel (pictured at right with HGR Salesman ) and Talleres Emmanuel have bought a number of items from HGR through the years, including gap bed lathes, OBI presses and assorted drill presses, all to be shipped via containers arranged by HGR.

HGR has set up a special page with answers to common questions asked by customers considering a trip from Mexico, Central or South America.

Rough Start With His Used Monarch Lathe

Tom Clouse came to HGR last Monday and got just what he wanted. Unfortunately, he took home an extra ding that he wasn’t expecting. Tom made his first trip to Euclid from his home in Barre, Massachusetts, about 575 miles one way, to purchase a used Monarch lathe to add to his machine shop. Tom is an aircraft mechanic, and he’s a big fan of Monarch equipment.

“They’re solid and they hold their tolerances,” Tom said. “I know what to expect when I“m using them.”

After he had the lathe loaded into the back of his Dodge pickup, though, Tom got something unexpected when he ventured out of the HGR parking lot.

“Some guy cut me off and I had to swerve,” Tom said. “When I did, the Monarch almost came out of the bed.”

Luckily, the lathe stayed in the back of the truck, and there was only minor damage to the side of the bed and the diamond plate bed liner.

“I was planning to take that off anyway,” said Tom as he strapped the lathe down again, this time with some surplus pallets on both sides of the lathe to stabilize the piece.

Even with the minor mishap, Tom said he would be back to HGR in the future … most likely.

“Yeah, I’m sure I’ll need something again,” said Tom, adding a familiar HGR customer refrain, “I just have to convince my wife that I need it.”