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Cuyahoga Valley Career Center opens robotics and manufacturing technology center

RAMTEC

On Jan. 14, Lt. Governor Mary Taylor assisted the Cuyahoga Valley Career Center (CVCC) Superintendent Dr. Celena Roebuck with the ribbon cutting and grand opening of its state-of-the-art Robotic and Advanced Manufacturing Technology Education Collaborative (RAMTEC) Center. Attendees to the ribbon cutting ceremony and open house entered through the RAMTEC Mobile Training Unit, a 26-foot trailer that the school will use to take its training programs on the road. Business partners were on hand to display their products, including Rockwell Automation, Buckeye Educational Systems, eduFACTOR, GPD Group, Lincoln Electric, Lorain County Community College, MAGNET, Mastercam, Parker Hannifin, RAF Automation, and Swagelok.

The 6,700 square-foot facility will assist CVCC in addressing the advanced manufacturing and engineering skills gap by preparing high school and adult students for careers in these fields. The facility houses robotic arms, automated welders, pneumatic and hydraulic training units, and programmable logic controllers. All of these are part of building a world-class metal fabrication and state-of-the art computer numeric control (CNC) training center. According to CVCC Superintendent Dr. Celena Roebuck, “RAMTEC will benefit high school students and adult education students, will be used to enhance our incumbent workers’ training programs, and also will allow us to expand the career services we provide to our eight associate districts. As part of a statewide initiative focused on advanced manufacturing, we can expand our influence and economic impact beyond the immediate CVCC area. It is exciting to see the resurgence of manufacturing in Northeast Ohio and to know that CVCC continues to play an integral role in that process.”

Recently, the Ohio Means Job website indicated that 357 full-time CNC jobs are vacant within a 30-mile radius of CVCC. When you broaden that search word to “manufacturing” rather than CNC there are more than 3,000 full-time vacancies listed within a 30-mile radius of CVCC.

Cuyahoga Valley Career Center serves the public school districts of Brecksville-Broadview Heights, Cuyahoga Heights, Garfield Heights, Independence, Nordonia Hills, North Royalton, Revere, and Twinsburg. Student workshops and Adult Education courses are open and available to all residents of Northeast Ohio. For more information on training programs in advanced manufacturing, which will prepare graduates for the FANUC Basic Control Certification, and in hydraulic systems call the school at (440) 746-8230 or review the website.

RAMTEC image

King Precision Solutions outfits facility with surplus from HGR

Break room

(Courtesy of Guest Blogger Todd King, president of King Precision Solutions in Erie, Pennsylvania)

King Precision Solutions designs and builds injection mold plastic parts. We have a couple of product lines that we developed: the Kingpin Shallow Water Anchor and the TV Shield Protective Enclosure.

I found HGR through an older gentleman who took me in under his wing. He was buying machinery for his own shop. I saw the great deals he was getting, and I did the same.

We have been purchasing equipment from HGR for 20 years, and I would say 90 percent of the equipment in our facility is from HGR – from the tile and paint on the floor to the lighting on the ceiling, and, of course, everything in between.

Our growth has been expedited due to the robotics and other high-end equipment that we purchased at a discount of 70 percent lower than new. With this equipment in place, we gained opportunities that we would have never had a chance to procure.

The photos show a CNC machine purchased and in operation and a robot that we integrated for hydro-dipping parts. The overhead door and glass door also are from HGR. The first pic shows our break area. Everything in that pic was bought from HGR and refurbished, including the cabinets, sinks and tile.

CNC machine Hydro Dippng parts Robot Overhead door

 

Ecuadoran customer visits HGR showroom last week

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For years, Francisco D’Amore worked with his family’s business and specialized in niche markets. At that business, he learned of HGR Industrial Surplus since the company had bought used equipment from HGR since it opened. D’Amore spun off his business, Impormore, and has been buying from HGR for approximately nine years.  He ships three to four, 40-foot-high cube containers per year back to Cuenca, Equador. He purchases mostly metalworking and fabrication equipment that he fixes for resale.

 

Jergens Inc. commits to workforce development and Collinwood

TeamJergens

Founded in 1942, Jergens Inc. is a tooling component manufacturer located in Cleveland’s Collinwood Neighborhood. Christy Schron dreamed of having his own machine shop with his son Jack. Christy and Jack first operated the business in a rented a garage on East 152nd Street. Soon, they outgrew the space, and Jergens’ found a new home on East 163rd off of St. Clair. In the midst of World War II, business was booming, and it was difficult to find a qualified workforce. Jergens began holding training classes in the shop every evening to keep up production and support the war effort.

 Business continued to grow as Jergens moved to its third Collinwood location on Nottingham Road. In 1999, Jergens had again outgrown its facility and relocated to its current home on South Waterloo on the site of the former Collinwood Yards. The company continues to honor this legacy in its lobby that is decorated with railroad artifacts and antiques.

 Jergens has been led since 1987 by its third generation of Schrons, with Jack Schron, Jr., currently at the helm as president. The family has demonstrated a commitment to keeping Jergens’ facilities in the City of Cleveland and maintaining jobs in Ohio. Jergens’ has even partnered with the Cuyahoga East Vocational Education Consortium (CEVEC) in a pilot program in which high school students use Jergens as their classroom for the entire year. The program has a full-time teacher who works with students at the Jergens’ facility by introducing them to careers in manufacturing and helping prepare them to enter the workforce.

 There currently are six divisions/subsidiaries under the Jergens, Inc. umbrella: Jergens Tooling Component Division (TCD), Jergens Industrial Supply (JIS), Assembly Systems Group (ASG), ACME Industrial Company, Jergens Shanghai, and Jergens India. TCD focuses on lean manufacturing solutions in three areas: work holding solutions, lifting solutions, and specialty fasteners. TCD’s product line-up includes fasteners, hoist rings, Kwik-Lok pins, and Ball-Lock mounting systems. JIS offers a full line of cutting tools, carbide, and other tool inserts, coolants, abrasives, drills, and other industrial supplies. ASG is a supplier of products for threaded fastener assembly, including torque-controlled electric screwdrivers, automation products, and production aides. ACME manufactures threaded inserts and bushings. Jergens’ also has international sales offices in Shanghai, China, and Mumbai, India.

 

 

Ingenuity Cleveland bridges the creative and manufacturing communities

Ingenuity blog photo

(Courtesy of Guest Blogger Annie Weiss, Ingenuity Cleveland)

Ingenuity formed as an organization in 2004 to create a destination event in Cleveland, IngenuityFest, to showcase our region’s deep artistic and cultural resources and explore the space where humans and technology intersect. Conceived as a “moveable feast,” IngenuityFest transforms underused and unknown spaces into highly visible performance and exhibition venues, sparking renewed interest in these locations and bringing audiences to the city’s core. In 2011, it embarked on a mission to become a year-round organization. Since then, it added two annual programs: Bal Ingénieux and the Cleveland Mini Maker Faire, an ongoing program: IngenuityLabs.

Now, Ingenuity has launched a new series – Agents of Ingenuity – based on the success of the pilot Engines of Ingenuity Summit at the 2014 IngenuityFest. The 2014 summit featured panel conversations around gaming, audience retention, intellectual property, and hacking health, along with a workshop on “the Art of the Pitch.” Agents of Ingenuity is a conversation series that brings together individuals from the creative community, big business, small start-ups, and academia to discuss topics that highlight Cleveland’s unique opportunities as a globally competitive city for innovation and manufacturing. Structured as unlikely conversations between these representatives, our program will continue to grow with evening cocktail discussions, social hacks and a larger Agents of Ingenuity Summit (stay tuned for this one!).

This past November, Ingenuity hosted its first two live conversations at the Bop Stop and featured Jack Schron (Jergens), Ethan Karp (MAGNET), Jeff Epstein (Health-Tech Corridor) and Erika Anthony (Cleveland Neighborhood Progress). The intimate setting allowed for great audience interaction; so, be sure to mark your calendars for the 3rd Thursday of the month as we announce additional live conversations there! Tickets are $15 per conversation and include a drink ticket.

As part of our mission to engender the flow of ideas, we complement our live conversations with recorded podcasts, creating a year-round network of the people driving our region forward. We work in partnership with Design Lab Early College High School, a STEM and project-based learning institution, as part of an emerging program in recording technology for students. The shows feature interviews with innovators based in Northeast Ohio plus ingenious representatives from beyond. Content promotes our sponsors and local businesses and ties our community together through a permanent archive.

To stay up to date on the program, or to check out our current podcasts be sure to visit our website.

Self-labeled “design scientist” uses surplus to build chopper

Krager bike

(photo courtesy of Michael Lichter Photography)

As a child, Josh Krager of Eye Spy Designs was obsessed with finding out how things worked. He not only disassembled small machinery items, he even put them back together. As a teen, He enjoyed reading parts and tool catalogs when not working at a small engine repair shop. Josh befriended a welder who taught him the trade, and Josh perfected his skill. He is an engineer, welder and fabricator by trade but a Mad Scientist by nature who envisions one-of-a-kind designs by using imagination, engineering and vintage finds to create artistic and useful inventions. He says, “I always look at what something can do, not what it does. Most of my inspiration comes from just thinking that I can do it a better or a different way.”

He has taken a Dodge Durango daily driver and turned it into a 10-wheeled mud truck on a one-ton chassis, built National Hot Rod Association drag car and drag bike chassis from scratch, and the build list goes on and on until we get to his most recent and fantastic creation.

It all started in March 2014, while cleaning his 6,000-square-foot shop. He stood looking at a motor, housed 15 feet up on pallet racking and mixed in with mud truck parts. This wasn’t just any motor. It was a 1968 Mercedes 2.1L diesel power plant with 23,000 actual kilometers. He pulled it down and placed it on his workbench where it sat for four weeks.

He started to think, “What can I do with this engine?” Friends would come over and ask, “What are you going to do with that engine?” After hearing the same question over and over, just to shut his friends up, he said he was going to build a motorcycle. Well, that shut them up, except for one longtime friend. He bet Josh that he couldn’t build a bike with that engine and finish the project for Geneva-On-The-Lake’s, Sept. 3, 2014 Thunder on the Strip Bike Rally. Lesson learned? Don’t bet against Josh. You will lose.

For tech geeks, makers, engineers and other design scientists, here are the specs:

Frame: Fifteen giant ironworker wrenches and round tubing

Front wheel: a Harley Davidson Road King spoked wheel and tire

Rear wheel: a Harley Davidson Reproduction Pie Crust Drag slick

(He fabricated the forks in a girder style that uses two air shocks to raise and lower the front with an air compressor mounted under the seat. The rear end is rigid; so, to maximize ride comfort, a suspension was used under the seat.)

Transmission: Along with the engine came the original ’68 Mercedes manual, four-speed transmission with reverse coupled to an industrial-style, right angle, 1:1 ratio gear box linked with a #50 chain.

Cooling system: Honda Aspencade with electric fan and Ford F350 heater core.

Overflow for the cooling system: a vintage brass fire extinguisher

Front brake: stock Harley Davidson

Rear brake: stock Harley Davidson disc brake

(Braided stainless brake lines tied it all together.)

Clutch: Honda Goldwing master cylinder, Toyota Land Cruiser slave cylinder and stock Mercedes single disc with a nickel copper clutch line

Electrical system: 60-amp screw-in house fuse with vintage cloth-covered wiring leading to vintage knife switches for headlamp, turn signals and air system controls

Front turn signals: 1930’s glass doorknobs

Rear brake and turn signals: vintage Power Pole insulators. All are LED illuminated.

Fuel tank: U.S. military Jerry can that is secured with a manure spreader chain

Fuel lines: custom-formed nickel-copper tubing

Foot boards: vintage 1950’s water skis

Horn and cheesy siren: donated by his best friend

Rear fender: inverted 1950 Ford 8N tractor fenders

Front fender: old-school posthole digger

Chin fairing: an old cultivator plow blade

Handle bars: right-angle ironworker spud wrenches

Rearview mirror: Moon Eyes Peep Mirror

Saddle: vintage horse saddle

Rear rack: an old iron fence

Where did he get all the “stuff” to make this fabulous creation? Garage and barn sales, auctions, antique stores, picking his friends’ and family members’ junk piles, donations left at the shop door, eBay, Craigslist, swap meets, and HGR Industrial Surplus’ showroom. Krager says, “I discovered HGR years ago when I used to shop at a competitor and HGR’s prices were much better. I have been shopping at HGR since the day they opened their doors. I have purchased everything from office furniture to surface grinders and milling machines. I even bought a very large off-road crane. The bike does have some electrical items and a few driveline pieces that I purchased from HGR. I am currently working on another bike similar to this one and three Rat Rod semis for which we’ve already purchased a few items for from HGR.”

The bike took slightly more than four months but less than 250 hours to build, weighs 1,312 pounds, can cruise up to 55 mph and gets 40 mpg. It is a street-legal, titled Ohio motor vehicle. If you see Josh out on the road, make sure to give him a thumbs up.

HGR’s surplus used on multiple film sets

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(photo courtesy of NASA)

Through the years, a number of film set decorators have purchased items from HGR’s showroom for use on the sets of films being shot in Cleveland, including Captain America and The Avengers. One designer stumbled across HGR about four years ago while trying to track down electrical waste (aka computers) for use on a set.

If you carefully watch the 2011 Avengers film, you can see 9,385 pounds of equipment, including a Sercem automation winder, a welding station enclosure, five germfree S/S fume hoods, an air pressure control, an assembly station, and a neat inspection machine purchased from HGR in two memorable scenes:

  • At the beginning, Black Widow is fighting off Russian mobsters and tangles one with chain hoists. Yep, the hoists came from HGR. And, the opening scenes were shot at the Space Power Facility at NASA Glenn’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio (pictured above)
  • In another scene in Loki’s lair, Dr. Erik Selvig, played by Stellan Skarsgard, and his minions are working with machinery on the Tesseract. The machinery, originally from a pill factory, was purchased from HGR. This scene was shot under an unfinished transit bridge in Cleveland.

Ever wonder what happens with the items used on a film set after the movie has been finished? The film company containers it and ships it to Los Angeles then keeps it in storage for six months to a year in case it needs to reshoot scenes. After that, it is scrapped, sold to a company such as HGR, or the film company has a huge studio sale, often advertised on Craigslist. Who’s up for a trip to L.A.? If not, you always can come to HGR’s showroom to see the stuff from which science fiction/fantasy films are made.

Community development corporations serve Collinwood

Beachland Ballroom

Collinwood originally was a village within Euclid Township, but it was annexed by the City of Cleveland in 1910. The neighborhood was built so manufacturing and railroad workers could walk home. Now, there are 17,000 people living in North Collinwood with 220 businesses, 195 of which are locally owned.

So, where does a community development corporation (CDC) come into the picture, and what role does it play? A CDC is a not-for-profit organization that promotes and supports community development through community programs, housing and real estate development, and small business support.

Collinwood is lucky enough to have two CDCs serving the neighborhood: Northeast Shores Development Corporation in North Collinwood and Collinwood-Nottingham Development Corporation serving South Collinwood.

Northeast Shores Development Corporation serves North Collinwood, the primarily residential area between East 140rd Street to the west, East 185th Street to the northeast, Lake Erie to the north, the Collinwood Railroad Yards and tracks to the south. A few facts about North Collinwood:

  • In the Waterloo Arts District, there was a 45-percent vacancy a few years ago with only four vacancies now due in large part to the Welcome to Collinwood initiative.
  • There’s a new effort to attract makers to East 185th through the Made in Collinwood initiative being unveiled in 2016 (stay tuned for further information). The CDC currently is interviewing 44 makers in the area and will do a public presentation of the interview report results in the first quarter.
  • There are 20-25 makers currently on East 185th Street, including a salsa producer, a soap maker, a vintner, an audio engineering production company, a hat maker, a dressmaker, an awards and trophies company, a newspaper publisher, and a digital designer.
  • A new video and music production facility is being built in the former LaSalle Theater with a scheduled early 2016 groundbreaking.
  • The CDC has a desire to connect makers with manufacturing facilities who can manufacture or package the items being created by the makers or for job opportunities for skilled production people.
  • Northeast Shores is funded through taxes, real estate transactions and philanthropy.

Collinwood-Nottingham Development Corporation serves South Collinwood, the primarily industrial area between East 134th Street on the west, Euclid Creek to the east, the Collinwood Railroad Yards and tracks to the north, and Woodworth Avenue to the southwest and Roseland Avenue to the Southeast.

 

Change. Nothing stays the same.

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How many of you remember the 1980s Van Halen song “Unchained?” David Lee Roth sang, “Change. Nothing stays the same. Unchained. Yeah, you hit the ground running.” Believe it or not, that’s how HGR Industrial Surplus in Euclid, Ohio, got its name. Founder Paul Betori had left his previous employer with a vision for a new business model. As he sat in his living room listening to Van Halen, Paul decided to hit the ground running (HGR) and formed HGR Industrial Surplus in 1998 with 13 employees.

Since then, the company has grown to more than 110 employees with a showroom of 500,000 square feet and recently purchased and dedicated its Nickel Plate Station building on Euclid Avenue. The mission of the company is to serve as a conduit between customers looking for affordable used machinery and equipment and manufacturers hoping to recoup some portion of their capital investments.

Because of its passion for manufacturing and the growth and development of industry in Northeast Ohio, the company decided to work with John Copic, publisher of The Euclid and Collinwood Observers, to offer this monthly column to showcase the amazing, fun, interesting and cutting edge manufacturing taking place in the region. It’s just another way of connecting customers and industry. There’s so much going on right in your neighborhood that you may not know about, but it affects you directly. Your friends and neighbors work for these companies. You buy their products. Their taxes improve your roads and schools. You have a vested interest in their success because they are contributing to a recovering and, hopefully, stable economy.

And, as the song says, change is inevitable, especially in manufacturing and industry. The economy has been a roller coaster ride for quite a few years. Families and businesses have had to learn to adapt and creatively problem solve to overcome challenges and turn them into opportunities.

In this column, we intend to showcase some of those opportunities and inspire you with success stories. What are local businesses doing in the community? What new development is happening in The Euclid Corridor? Let’s hear firsthand from some local businesses. What are their plans for the area? What tips and tricks do they have for others? What best practices can we apply to our own businesses for success? What weird and wacky manufacturing and product photos can we share?

Speaking of wacky photos, did you know that HGR Industrial Surplus buys and sells everything? Literally! Here is an example of an interesting item that recently became available in its showroom. These GM gears are 19,000 pounds each. Does anyone know how they might have been used? We started the conversation on Facebook.

You also can see this article in our new monthly column “Hit the Ground Running” in the Collinwood Observer and the Euclid Observer.

Gears2

Section 179 signed into law: tax break for buying equipment

32420632_sAccording to the Machinery Dealers National Association, on Friday, Dec. 18, President Obama signed the $1.8 Spending and Tax Bill into law.  Earlier on Friday, the Senate gave final congressional approval to the bill, which includes nearly $700 billion in tax breaks.

The new permanent Section 179 expensing limit allows a business to take a current year deduction of the full purchase amount up to $500,000 for assets under $2 million.

Example Savings*

Original Equipment Cost:                  $500,000

New Potential Tax Savings:               $175,000

Final Equipment Cost:                       $325,000

Cash Savings on

Equipment Purchase:                        $175,000

*Assuming a 35% tax qualifying purchase

This information does not constitute tax advice, please check with your tax advisor on how this applies to your business.

HGR’s Austin, Texas, call center relocated

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HGR Industrial Surplus spent months searching for the perfect place for our call center in Austin, Texas. After finding the best location for employees and visitors, the company renovated the space to suit its needs. Last week, employees relocated from downtown Austin at 210 Barton Springs Road and opened shop in North Austin at 1826 Kramer Lane.

At this location, there is free parking, no downtown traffic congestion, and visitors as well as employees can drive up to the front door without a long walk or having to trek through inclement weather conditions.

Our employees in Austin make outgoing calls looking for surplus to buy. It all starts with them!

If you are in the Austin area, pay us a visit!

HGR creating manufacturing resource center

Word CloudIn partnership with Manufacturing Advocacy & Growth Network (MAGNET), HGR is building the materials to create a manufacturing resource center inside of its customer lounge. The center will house pamphlets, handouts, books and periodicals that provide information about educational and manufacturing opportunities, as well as information about MAGNET’s services and programming. HGR also will create an online center with links to additional resources.

Some of the organizations that will have information available in the center include: Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International; National Association of Manufacturers; the five Ohio regional representatives of the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MAGNET, TechSolve, CIFT, PolymerOhio, APEG and FastLane); local colleges and universities with industrial, technical and manufacturing courses and programs; Ingenuity Cleveland and the Nickel Plate Historical & Technical Society.

Once the resource center is up and running, HGR will make an announcement so that you can stop by to peruse the materials.

Sponsorship/partnership further manufacturing in Ohio

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HGR loves to partner with other organizations, as well as provide sponsorship, to promote manufacturing in Ohio. This year, we have had the opportunity to work with three groups of folks doing amazing things to stimulate the growth of the area and enhance the life of its residents.

Euclid HS Robotics Team

First, the company worked with Bob Torrelli, Euclid High School Science Department chair and physics teacher, and his six-student robotics team to prep for its Apr. 25 Alliance for Working Together (AWT) RoboBot Competition as part of the science, technology, engineering, arts and technology (STEAM) initiative. AWT is a coalition of more than 75 local companies that encourage youth to consider jobs in manufacturing. This year, 35 high schools participated. The team worked for more than six months to create an indestructible, remote-controlled battle robot made from a 15-pound aluminum frame with three motors, heat-treated steel blades and Lexan armor. Its robot faced off in battle with the robots of the other high school teams. Euclid made it to the fourth round of competition, tying for ninth place out of 35 and won the award for best sportsmanship. Several working sessions with breakfast were held at HGR’s office at 20001 Euclid Avenue. The company offered design tips and provided materials and equipment. Members of the team and Torelli will be at HGR’s Oct. 1 dedication ceremony and sale to show off their robot and answer questions, as well as to be recognized by HGR for its efforts. The 2016 team is beginning to organize. Stay tuned for a future blog post on its progress.

Next up, HGR is sponsoring the Sept. 30 [M]Power Manufacturing Assembly put on by The Manufacturing Advocacy and Growth Network, aka MAGNET, at the John S. Knight Center in Akron, Ohio. The event’s purpose is to address the “challenges of today’s changing manufacturing landscape. “The event will explore how attendees can maintain their competitive advantage, tackling essential issues of workforce development, ideation strategy, digital marketing optimization, and operations management,” states MAGNET’s website. This year’s keynote speaker is Sean Stack, CEO of Aleris. HGR has purchased a table for 10 and will have a display table to distribute information. In addition, we partnered with MAGNET to create a manufacturing resource center inside of HGR’s customer lounge. The center will house pamphlets, handouts, books and periodicals that provide information about manufacturing opportunities, as well as information about MAGNET’s services and programming. HGR also will create an online center with links to additional resources.

Last but not least, HGR is sponsoring Ingenuity Cleveland’s eleventh-annual Ingenuity Festival on Oct. 2-4; this year, it’s being held at Voinovich Park. This festival of creativity and innovation celebrates art, music, technology and the maker’s movement. We will have a table at the event and host information on Ingenuity Cleveland in our new resource center. HGR also provided monetary and in-kind contributions for the Iron Architect event, a competition where four teams compete to create a unique seating environment within the festival grounds using an array of materials, $200 at Home Depot and a “secret ingredient” that will be selected from the plethora of items available at HGR’s showroom.

The 200-year history of HGR’s site: From farm to wartime plant to GM plant to HGR Industrial Surplus

Nickel Plate Road

(Photo courtesy of Belt Magazine (http://beltmag.com/train-dreams/)

In anticipation of HGR’s Oct. 1 dedication of its recently purchased building as “Nickel Plate Station,” we wanted to take you on a walk down memory lane to the history of the site from the 1800s to the present day.

Logan Family Farm

  • In the 1800s, the Logan Family farmed 68 acres of land along Euclid Avenue in the Village of Euclid then sold the land to a realty company in 1912.
  • 1912-1926: The realty company and the Village fought over the land’s usage as commercial versus residential, respectively. In 1926, the Supreme Court found in favor of the Village as the landmark case that enabled fledgling zoning laws.
  • 1942-1945: In spite of the residential ruling, The Defense Plant Corporation, part of the U.S. government, built then leased a wartime plant to Cleveland Pneumatic Aerol to manufacture landing gear and rocket shells for the WWII effort.
  • 1945: The war ended, and the land became vacant.
  • 1946: The structure housed Cleveland Ordinance District offices, surplus goods and federal government offices.
  • 1947: Ferguson Tractor bought the property with the intent to create a tractor factory, but that plan never came to fruition; so, the land was sold to The Fisher Body Division of General Motors.
  • 1948: Fisher Body began manufacturing bodies for delivery trucks and Chevy and Oldsmobile station wagons then transporting them for assembly via a rail loading bay inside the building that was a stopping point for The Nickel Plate Road, a rail line that connected New York, Chicago and St. Louis since 1881.

Body Manufacture

  • 1958: 100,000 units were produced by 2,900 employees, including bodies for the El Camino.
  • 1960: Bodies for convertibles were added to the line.
  • 1965: The Euclid plant became the sole producer for two muscle cars, the Oldsmobile Toronado and Buick Riviera.
  • 1970: The cost of manufacturing auto bodies and transporting them to final assembly plants became too expensive. GM stopped production and retooled the plant into a sewing center to make interior trim and upholstery.
  • 1970-1980: Labor disputes and strikes took place.
  • 1972: The plant began to make 100,000 units of GM’s first airbag system for high-end 1974-1976 cars, but stopped when only 10,000 were sold in three years.
  • 1982: GM planned to close the plant but UAW workers nationwide negotiated concessions to save the plant, where it continued to make seat covers, door panels, sun shades and other interior parts.
  • 1986: The plant received a contract to make boat seats and cushions for Sea Ray Boats.
  • 1993: GM closed the plant.
  • 1996: GM sold the property to a development company.
  • 1998: HGR Industrial Surplus moved into a portion of the building to realize the owner’s vision of an ongoing industrial garage sale.
  • 2014: HGR purchased the entire 900,000-square-foot building and property and began improvements.
  • Oct. 1, 2015: HGR officially dedicates the property and facility, including tenant space, as “Nickel Plate Station.”

HGR Entrance

 

What’s in the future for HGR, Nickel Plate Station and the City of Euclid? Stay tuned!

“The Untouchables” Tie for Ninth at RoboBots Competition

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A team Euclid High School students, under the direction of Bob Torrelli, began preparing for the AWT RoboBots competition months ago, and their work paid off with two wins at the battle robots tournament held Saturday, April 25 at Lakeland Community College.

Check out videos of The Untouchables.

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Sponsored by HGR Industrial Surplus and SC Industries, The Untouchables claimed an opening round win over The Gang for Good. In the next round, The Untouchables claimed a decision over The Vikinators.

Next up was a meeting with Dreadnaught, the team that would eventually claim the tournament championship. The Untouchables fell short in that match, and slipped into the consolation bracket to take on Polaris. Again, The Untouchables came up short against on of the tournament’s top teams, ending their run with a 2-2 record and tied for ninth place in the tournament.

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HGR, Team Euclid Partner for RoboBots Showdown

The sparks will fly when area high school students square off in the 2015 RoboBots Competition Saturday, April 25 at Lakeland Community College.

Team Euclid, made up of Euclid High School students and sponsored by HGR Industrial Surplus, is one of the teams preparing to put its 15-pound remote control battle robot into the arena.

RoboBots is a program of the Alliance for Working Together, a Cleveland area group of companies focused on advancing manufacturing through training and education, outreach and strategic partnerships and grants.

RoboBots teams began preparing their battle bots back in December. Team Euclid visited HGR and picked up a few items to add to their battle bot. Over the past few months, students have been able to enjoy hands-on experience in manufacturing, working alongside engineers and machinists to create a winning battle robot.

For more information on RoboBots, take a look at the video from the 2014 competition.

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