An artist and a carpenter team up to create public art

JP Costello and Erin Guido of So Fun Studio

 

(Q&A with JP Costello and Erin Guido of So Fun Studio)

What services does your business provide?

So Fun Studio is an interactive design collaborative that creates joyful and lighthearted public art and products.

How did you get your training?

So Fun is a collaboration between two artists, Erin Guido and John Paul Costello.

Erin studied printmaking at Indiana University and urban planning at University of Michigan. She is currently a project manager at LAND studio, a public art and public space nonprofit in Cleveland. She is also a mural artist and has multiple works up around town.

John Paul started in the trades with a metal fabrication company and then worked as a carpenter. He now has his own design and fabrication business and works on everything from residential and commercial furniture to more unique jobs, such as a custom bamboo motorcycle seat or a twenty person foosball table. He is a self-trained artist and creates wooden sculptures.

Tell about some interesting projects that you’ve worked on.

We collaborated on an interactive art show at the Akron Art Museum called Please Touch in spring 2016. After we completed that show, we formalized So Fun Studio because we knew we wanted to create more interactive art works together. It made us so happy to watch museum goers have fun touching, changing, and playing with the art work. The world needs more moments of joy!

So Fun Studio Please Touch installation

TODAY I FEEL, a kinetic artwork with wheels that spin freely from one another, is probably the most successful installation from Please Touch. The sculpture is roughly 6’x6’x6′ and made of 15 wheels, each with 30 sections of hand-painted alphabet and punctuation. Users can display their “feelings” by moving the wheels and changing the text. Currently, TODAY I FEEL is on display at the Cleveland Public Library.

So Fun Studio Today I Feel sculpture

 

Since Please Touch, we have participated in gallery shows and created art work for public events. For example, DANCING MACHINE is a full-scale teeter totter with characters attached to gears that “dance” as you teet and tott. It was on display at the Ohio City Street Festival and Gordon Square’s Hip2BeSquare outdoor summer event.

So Fun Studio teeter totter

Most recently, we built I HAVE MANY, a 4’x35′ interactive billboard installed on a building rooftop at 78th Street Studios for the 2018 CAN Triennial, a curated contemporary art festival featuring artists from Northeast Ohio. From the ground, people can pull cords that are connected to one of four indexing gears to change the displayed words. There are 256 different versions of the artwork depending which combination of words in the sentence the user selects.

What materials do you use?

The recent interactive artworks are constructed from Baltic Birch Plywood for the main body, along with wooden gears or indexing pins. We also use metal, plastics, or off-the-shelf materials, like bicycle gears, when necessary for different moving parts. We normally use acrylic paint or exterior house paint for the added graphics, lettering, and illustration.

Do you have employees/collaborators or work alone? 

So Fun Studio is the two of us, although John Paul’s father has majorly helped many times with construction and installation when time is crunched. Our friends also have helped multiple times with painting the pieces. We are lucky to have so much support!

What is the mission of So Fun Studio?

We aim to use art and design to bring moments of joy, humor, and imagination to anyone and everyone!

I understand that you are HGR customers. How did you find out about HGR Industrial Surplus?

Word of mouth from other artists and builders. We remember first walking into the facility and the feeling of excitement, like a kid in a candy store.

What kinds of items have you purchased at HGR Industrial Surplus, and how have you used them?

A few metal carts and a table or two along with miscellaneous little odds and ends that sparked our interest.  We currently are on the hunt for a metal lathe and mill; so, we will be back in soon!

What inspires you?

Erin is inspired by street art, pop-up books, playgrounds, walking around cities, and anything that is colorful and happy. John Paul is inspired by nature, cityscapes, abandoned buildings, Whirligigs, and practically anything else with some sort of motor.

JP Costello catan wall
designed by JP Costello
JP Costello hinge stairs
designed by JP Costello

Q&A with Waterloo Arts Fest Artist-in-Residence Angela Oster

Artist Angela Oster

When did you know you were an artist?

I’ve always loved to draw and make things, but it took a while to consider myself an artist. I think it was after I developed the habit of drawing every day that I had the confidence to call myself an artist.

How did you get your training?

I have a BFA from The Cleveland Institute of Art and took vocational commercial art in high school. I also did a mentorship with Dan Krall, an illustrator and animator. I also practice a lot on my own.

What types of work do you create?

I mostly draw cartoons. My goal is to make them funny, weird, cute and kind. I also make small sculptures based on my drawings. I like to call them delicate monsters and wide eyed weirdies. In art school, I studied installation and performance art; so, I also am interested in interactive, public art. But the running theme is to invoke delight, whether it’s a cute drawing or a playful sculpture.

Angela Oster vampire cartoon

What inspires you?

I’m inspired by everything! Sometimes it’s a vintage greeting card or an old video clip of an animation or an antique broach. I’m a fan of so many artists and so many kinds of art, and it gets all mashed up into my drawings and sculpts. There is an impulse that happens.

What do you do when you are not creating art?

When I’m not creating art, I like to look at art in museums and galleries. I teach at BayArts and work part time at Ohio Citizen Action. I love to spend time with my family and friends, watch movies, swim, and go to flea markets and libraries.

Have you shopped at HGR for your work?

Yes! HGR is like a candy store for artists. There is so much raw material; it’s boundless and inspiring, and it’s affordable!

If so, what have you found and how have you used it?

I found some orange “High Voltage” tape to use in a public sculpture for Waterloo Arts. The tape was a turning point in the evolution of my idea for the sculpture, and that would not have happened without HGR.

How did you get involved as an artist-in-residence with Waterloo Arts Fest?

I have participated as a vendor for many years at the fest. I think it is so unique in that it’s a real neighborhood event. There are a lot of hands-on activities for visitors of all ages. This year, I was invited to do a residency, so I jumped at the chance.

Tell us about the project.

I built an “Orange Removal Machine” — a community sculpture that served as a voter registration booth and also helped gather objects for “A Color Removed” at SPACES Gallery. I built a giant, open structure out of hula hoops and covered it with orange tape. I asked people to bring me any orange objects: clothing, toys, sports equipment, household items, etc. The objects have been cataloged and displayed as part of Michael Rakowitz’s installation at SPACES, during FRONT International.

Angela Oster Orange Removal Machine concept drawingAngela Oster Orange Removal MachineAngela Oster Orange Removal MachineAngela Oster objects for A Color Removed

What’s next?

I’m organizing a pop-up group show at the Osterwitz Gallery located at 15615 Waterloo Road in Cleveland on Sept. 7. I gave 30 artists a “Ting-a-ling Tina” Doll, a tiny doll inside a tiny phone. Each artist can customize the doll, or make a new piece inspired by the doll. It should be a fun show!

Euclid Chamber of Commerce Social Media Workshop

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

On Aug. 15 at 6:30 p.m. at Euclid Public Library, 631 E. 22nd St., Euclid, you can learn to identify the social media tools that will be most effective for your business, how to set up accounts on these platforms and how to manage social media so that it does not rule your working day. Instructor Chic Dickson, founder and owner, C7Branding, which specializes in digital business identity solutions understands that non-profits, social work agencies, and government entities have often used social media purely to market their brand to their potential clients and funders. Chic has combined social media with evidence-based strategies to cultivate client engagement and keep client loyalty longer. Chic has been featured in The Plain Dealer, WKYC, The News-Herald, and various other websites and blogs for her success in utilizing social media to reach audiences from all over the world.

This is a no-cost workshop! You can register here.

Chick Dickson C7Branding

Euclid Chamber of Commerce Coffee Connections: Willoughby Western Lake County Chamber of Commerce

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

SAVE THE DATE! Join the Euclid Chamber of Commerce at The Cabin, 28810 Lakeshore Blvd., Willowick, Ohio, on Aug. 14 from 8:00-9:00 a.m. EST for a presentation from the Willoughby Western Lake County Chamber of Commerce over coffee and networking.

There is no cost to attend.  Membership is not required.

Please register here.

Euclid Chamber of Commerce Marketing Plan Workshop

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

 

On Aug. 14 at 8:30 a.m. at Euclid Public Library, 631 E. 222nd St., Euclid, you can learn how to develop a well-designed marketing plan and learn how it can help you raise awareness of your business, attract more customers and boost sales. Instructor Chic Dickson, founder and owner, C7Branding, which specializes in digital business identity solutions understands that non-profits, social work agencies, and government entities have often used social media purely to market their brand to their potential clients and funders. Chic has combined social media with evidence-based strategies to cultivate client engagement and keep client loyalty longer. Chic has been featured in The Plain Dealer, WKYC, The News-Herald, and various other websites and blogs for her success in utilizing social media to reach audiences from all over the world.

This is a no-cost workshop! You can register here.

Chick Dickson C7Branding

Q&A with Waterloo Arts Fest Artist-in-Residence Susie Underwood

fan ax set design by Susie Underwood for Near West Theater's production of Aida
fan ax set design Near West Theater’s 2018 production of Aida

When did you know you were an artist?

I have always loved making things and coming up with creative narratives. When I was a kid, I’d read fantasy or science fiction novels, and then I would create costumes or props inspired by the stories. That being said, I don’t think I was comfortable calling myself an artist until I had completed some installations with my former art collective, Art Club, around my mid-20s. I felt that I was actually doing something unique and from my own perspective for the first time, and that helped me to feel comfortable calling myself an artist.

How did you get your training?

I went to Ohio State University for art and journalism, got my master’s in art museum education from Antioch University Midwest, and gained a lot of my experience from working with studio and family programs at the Columbus Museum of Art. Much of my knowledge is self-taught. School can only get you so far.

What types of work do you create?

Susie Underwood in costume I like to “try on” many different types of art making, and I’m usually most successful when I combine installation with performance and audience participation. So, instead of having an art show, I might set it up like a garage sale. Or I might perform lounge songs while dressed as an alien, while cracking nerdy jokes and harassing the audience with props. For the Waterloo Arts Fest, I created a “living room” under a tent and painting everything white, so that visitors could decorate my little “home.” I prefer to change the atmosphere and environment from the usual visual art experience, which I find to be pretty boring.

What inspires you?

I love finding new artists on Instagram; there are some amazing artists in Los Angeles, New Orleans and Melbourne right now. Drag queens have really elevated their practice into some of the best contemporary art out there, and they have become a big influence on my performance approach. I am also inspired by the City of Cleveland, the weird history, and the kitsch and beauty that is taken for granted. I love music and science fiction; so, that comes out sometimes.

What are your thoughts on with art therapy?

I am interested in the growing field of art therapy but I’m not actively involved in it. I curated an exhibition at the Columbus Museum of Art which highlighted the different ways that art can be used therapeutically. I was showcasing the field to the general public, who may not be aware of all that happens or the potential of art therapy.

How did you get involved as an artist-in-residence with Waterloo Arts Fest?

I was recommended as a potential artist-in-residence because I am good at creating interactive, participatory experiences and working with the public. My years as a museum educator made me that way.

Tell us about the project.

I set up a 10’ x 10’ tent with living room furniture inside. Everything was be white, even my clothes, so that visitors could paint and decorate my little home. I also had a chandelier they could help create by adding junk from their purses, and a rag rug that they could help weave. It was inspired by my love for rehabbing and decorating my home. I want people to understand that creativity doesn’t just have to take place in an art studio; it should be infused into every aspect of life. Creativity is vital to our survival, and we need it now more than ever. We need leaders who can create new ideas, not just destroy things they don’t like.

What’s next?

I have a potential mural on the horizon, if I can ever finish the design!

Susie Underwood mural for Porco Lounge, Cleveland
mural for Porco Lounge, Cleveland
Susie Underwood's WEB for the Columbus Museum of Art's Wonder Room
WEB for the Columbus Museum of Art’s Wonder Room
Susie Underwood's banners for Near West Theater's 2018 production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame
banners for Near West Theater’s 2018 production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Susie Underwood

Meet a local manufacturer of dental crowns, impants and dentures

Moskey Dental Laboratories

 

Rob Lash , president, Moskey Dental Laboratories(Q&A with Robert Lash, president, Moskey Dental Laboratories)

What is dental restoration?

A dental restoration replaces a tooth or teeth in a patient’s mouth. The dentist makes either an analog or digital impression and sends it to Moskey Dental Laboratories with a prescription for the type of restoration he/she wants.

What is your background? I see that you completed your undergraduate studies at Emory University and law school at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law. How did you end up in dental restoration?

Despite my education, my family’s business was our dental lab since my grandfather started it in 1924. When my father’s partners left the business I joined to help him continue.

When, why and who started the business?

The name of my grandfather’s lab was Mutual Dental Lab. Over the years he, my father and uncle acquired other labs and merged with Moskey in the mid-60s. The name was changed to Moskey Mutual, and I dropped Mutual because too many people thought we were an insurance company.

Why did you select your current location?

Our first location was in Midtown at 71st and Euclid, and we were downtown after that until we had to move because we were located on the site of what is now Progressive Field and Quicken Loans Arena. We like Midtown due to the ease of access to the highways and public transportation.

Do patients come directly to you, or do the dentists place an order?

Patients will come to our lab for tough tooth shades and for quick repairs of removable restorations, but only at the direction of their dentist.

What is your favorite part of your job or most interesting moment? 

I know it sounds corny, but giving people their teeth back is very satisfying and important for the patient’s general health. Unfortunately, we don’t often see the results of our work in patients’ mouths, but we appreciate when dentists send us pictures of a happy patient.

What is the greatest challenge in your industry?

Finding trained dental technicians. Last century there were many Eastern European immigrants in Northeast Ohio who were well-trained, and there were many dental technology programs available. Now, as far as I know, there are no such programs in Ohio.

How have things changed in your career, and what does the future of dental laboratories look like?

The future is here, and it’s digital — from the dentist’s office to our lab where we can design almost any restoration with a CAD program, and then manufacture that restoration by an additive (3D printing, laser sintering) process, or subtractive (milling).

digital milling of dentures at Moskey Dental Laboratories
digital milling of dentures at Moskey Dental Laboratories
digital milling of dentures at Moskey Dental Laboratories
digitally milled dentures

Why is restoration so expensive?

What we charge the dentist is not what the dentist charges the patient. With crowns and implants, there is often precious metal involved and expensive implant parts that are highly machined for optimum results. We have no control over the final cost, but I’d say the four years (plus for specialists) of post-graduate education, the yearly continuing education, and the many expenses of running a dental office certainly have a lot do with what the patient may consider an expensive restoration!

How did you know Christopher Palda, the HGR Industrial Surplus customer who put us in touch with you?

He does work for Stone Oven Bakery, which rents space in my building.

Has Christopher repaired or built items for you?

Yes, he’s repaired or attempted to repair numerous pieces of equipment for us.

What do you do when you are not running Moskey? 

Enjoying time with my wife, visiting my three kids who all live out of town, playing guitar in bands, road bicycle riding, sleep!

What inspires you?

The awesome beauty and power of nature.

What is the best advice that you would give to others?

Do something that brings you joy, whether that’s inside or outside of your career.

Summer art-camp students design and build wind chimes using reclaimed materials

Larry Fielder of Rust Dust & Other 4 Letter Words
Larry advising and ensuring safety

Waterloo Arts offered its annual Round Robin summer arts camp to children aged 6-13. The first session was held July 9-20 and the second session is July 23-Aug. 3. HGR Industrial Surplus was a sponsor because we are invested in S.T.E.A.M. education.

more raw materials Waterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter Words raw materials

On July 17, the students used repurposed, reclaimed and salvaged materials at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter Words to make wind chimes. Larry Fielder, owner, found 90% of the materials at Goodwill and The Salvation Army. Students used wire, drills and other hand tools to put together their metal and wood creations. It was amazing to watch the teamwork as they engineered and problem solved together to create functional and decorative objects.

Waterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter WordsWaterloo Arts Round Robin at Rust, Dust & Other 4 Letter Words

Local community college assists manufacturers with setting up state-approved apprenticeship training programs

 

Chrissy Cooney of LCCC(Q&A with Christin (aka Chrissy) Cooney, program coordinator, Lorain County Community College)

When did the apprenticeship programs begin at LCCC?

LCCC did customized apprenticeships for individual companies, including Ford, for 30 years, and still does. But, the new state-approved apprenticeship training program counts toward a degree and is registered with and approved by the state, not just internal to the company. The Medina County pilot, in partnership with Cuyahoga Community College, began in January 2017 with the first group of students starting their apprenticeship training in August 2017. Next term, they will be on machines at Medina County Career Center with LCCC and Tri-C faculty teaching. Each semester, the apprentices take one course through Tri-C and one course through LCCC, but the LCCC faculty members travel to Tri-C to teach the courses there for the pilot companies from Medina County. There currently are 15 shared students in the program with eight registered to LCCC and seven registered to Tri-C. We have taken collaboration to a new level and broken down barriers between colleges.

What is the difference between an apprenticeship and an approved state-registered apprenticeship?

ApprenticeOhio, a division of the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, approves these apprenticeships, and these apprentices are required to meet strict codes. Students end up with a credential that’s nationally portable. Employers are recognized for maintaining high standards of quality training and advancement.  LCCC offers lots of support for the employers, which results in better retention of skilled talent.

What manufacturing apprenticeships do you offer?

Currently, we offer apprenticeships in all of the programs in the engineering division, including alternative energy, automation engineering, construction, digital fabrication, electronic engineering, engineering technology, industrial safety, manufacturing engineering, mechatronics, welding, but not all of them are state-registered. We are trying to get digital fabrication, industrial safety, mechatronics and welding into the state-approved program since those are the fields where employees can succeed with training and a journeyman’s card, while the other areas usually require a bachelor’s degree to work in the field. The current state-registered cohort is in tool & die. We already have submitted industrial safety to the state and will be submitting welding and agriculture next.

How does a company become part of this program?

They need to sign on as a partner with a letter of support and have one journeyman, or someone with equivalent experience, in their organization per apprentice who is willing to supervise on-the-job training.

Do the students or the participating companies get paid?

These apprenticeships are a win-win for everyone: The sponsoring company gets skilled employees and a $2,500 stipend from the state through April 2019 for each new apprentice; the apprentice continues to earn a full-time salary while their classes paid are for by their employer, which means no student-loan debt and years of income; and Tri-C and LCCC get students.

In the end, it only costs a participating company about $2,500 in educational costs, after the stipend, to develop a high-potential employee into a skilled, state-licensed journeyman. In addition, the registered apprentice has a state identification number, not just a college certification. So, when he or she finishes, that person is a journeyman who is qualified to work anywhere in the industry, not just trained in that company’s methods. Finally, the student will graduate with a one-year certification or an associate’s degree that can be applied to further education.

How long do the apprenticeships run?

The current tool & die program requires 780 contact (in-class) hours with the teacher, 32 semester credit hours and 8,000 hours of on-the-job training. It takes about 3.5 years to complete the course credit, since there are no summer classes held so that employees can work overtime during the busy season then another six months to complete the work hours. So, in four years, apprentices get the “golden ticket.”

Which companies currently are participating?

Twelve companies came to us and said they would each bring at least one employee in order for the class to run. We ran with 15 students in this first cohort who currently work for Automation Tool & Die, Clamco, Atlantic Tool & Die, Shiloh Industries, and Superior Roll Forming.

How do you help the sponsoring companies?

Since most human resources teams do not have the time to administer an apprenticeship in a small- to mid-sized company, we shift the burden of administrative duties to the college as the sponsor. We do all of the paperwork and work with the state.

What is does the RAMP acronym at LCCC refer to?

Retooling Adults in Manufacturing Programs. It’s basically an acronym that we use to brand our restructured manufacturing programs that now have stackable credentials to allow students to build on their education and training with a certificate, a one-year degree and an associate’s degree that is then transferrable to a four-year university toward a bachelor’s degree for fields that require one.

Do you currently have a mobile classroom?

We have an eight-student mobile welding trailer sponsored by Lincoln Electric, and Cuyahoga Community College has a manufacturing trailer. We rent the trailers to each other in order to share resources to best serve our students.

What is planned for the future?

As mentioned, we hope to add other areas of the engineering program to the state-registered apprenticeship training process, but since we are doing manufacturing well, we would like to add information technology, health care and other business-related areas in partnership with Cuyahoga Community College. And, we ALWAYS are looking for faculty in the trades who can teach part time around their work schedules.

Nick on of the students in LCCC's apprenticeship training program
Nick, one of the apprentices in the first cohort with LCCC/Tri-C’s apprenticeship training program

Euclid Chamber of Commerce hosting civilian response to active shooter event

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

 

 

On July 25 from 10-11:30 a.m. the Euclid Chamber of Commerce is holding CRASE: Civilian Response to Active Shooter Event presented by the Euclid Police Department for Euclid businesses at the Lincoln Electric Welding & Technology Center, 22800 St. Clair Ave., Euclid, Ohio.

In the last two years, there have been 50 active shooter incidents in the United States; four occurred in Ohio; 17 occurred in a business environment. This presentation can be helpful to business owners, human resources managers, security personnel, employees or anyone interested in learning more. Information presented may be useful when developing active-shooter policies and procedures for the workplace. Resources will be provided.

This event is free, and you do not need to be a chamber member to attend. Registration is required.

Please register here.

An HGR customer shares her creative repurposing story

spools purchased at HGR Industrial Surplus and re-used as plant display stands

(Courtesy of an HGR customer who wishes to remain anonymous)

We are an HGR Industrial Surplus family. My husband first noticed your sign on a drive by the area. Since he has a manufacturing background, he stopped in to see what you were all about. That was about 15 years ago.

My first purchase, after a few foraging trips, was a roll of fabric to use as skirting for tables for my garden club’s flower show. We are still using that fabric today. One thing led to another, and some of the other purchases for the garden club include spools to stack for pedestals to put flower arrangements on, cardboard tubes for short pedestals, and coat racks to display hats. We also bought industrial aprons and gloves to repurpose for fundraisers. Aisle 1 is my place to shop; you never know what you’ll find.

My husband and I have a few HGR chairs that we use in our home. One was a Saturday morning breakfast special for only $2.50! We have a very nice bookcase in our dining room. I also have a great carrying case for my laptop computer.

Two of our grandsons and other visiting family members have been taken to HGR to see what we feel is one of Cleveland’s attractions.

Highland Heights Garden Club displays purchased at HGR Industrial Surplus

HGR Industrial Surplus continues green initiatives

recycling at HGR

As a recycling company that buys industrial surplus and resells it to put it back into service and keep it out of landfills, recycling is part of our culture. As our Controller Ed Kneitel says, “We want to be good stewards of our environment.” To that end, we have been shredding paper and donating it to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History for cage bedding and animal enrichment. Our wooden skids and baled cardboard are picked up and recycled. We sell our used oil that is drained from equipment to someone who uses it to heat his building. During our renovation, we had energy-efficient lighting installed.

But, we decided to go one step further. We noticed that we were generating more than 85 gallons of plastic water bottles and 30-35 cases of aluminum pop cans per month and 200,000 pieces of paper per year. This week, we installed blue recycling bins for paper, plastic bottles and aluminum cans in both of our break rooms, the customer lounge and at individual desks. Now, our employees and customers can contribute to a more sustainable world.

Thanks for your participation when you visit HGR’s showroom!

Q&A with Beachland Ballroom’s Co-owner Cindy Barber

Cindy Barber and Mark Leddy, owners of Beachland Ballroom in Collinwood

Are you a musician?

No, but I am passionate about music.

What made you open a concert venue?

I worked for music/record companies, including Decca which later became MCA, when I was 18 doing office/administrative work and was exposed to the business. I took orders from people like Michael Stanley for their record stores.

I moved to the area because of the lake, rented for a while then bought a house on Lake Erie so I could look at the sunset every night. I was the editor of the Cleveland Free Times, which was bought by a chain. So, I moved on to do something to help the neighborhood. It took a lot of sweet talking with the banks because no one wanted to support a concert venue in North Collinwood.

What did you do prior to The Beachland?

I helped found the Cleveland Free Times and was a writer, editor and production manager. I also ran the production department at Northern Ohio Live.

How did The Beachland Ballroom get its name?

Euclid Beach Park, an amusement park from 1894 to 1969 operated in the area less than a half mile north of the building. The term “Beachland” became slang for the North Collinwood Neighborhood at that time, and the venue was named in homage to the era.

Why did you locate in Collinwood?

I’ve lived in Collinwood since 1986 and wanted to do a destination location in my neighborhood with the hope of heading off some of the crime starting to happen. I also knew that I couldn’t afford to open a place in the Flats or downtown. I found this former Croatian hall, brought in a sound man who said it could be a good club, approached Mark Leddy, who was booking bands at Pat’s in the Flats, to be my partner, and the rest is history.

How do you pick which musical acts to host?

My partner does most of the booking now. After 18 years on the map, booking agents who represent talent reach out to us, and we trust them to give us quality artists for reasonable prices.

How many acts have come through The Beachland to date?

Within three weeks of being open, the White Stripes played the Beachland. Mark booked a lot of garage rock that first month, and we were off to a good start. Since then, I would estimate that close to 30,000 bands have played The Beachland because, on average, we book three bands per night in each room five nights per week.

Who is your favorite musical artist?

I like music from the 60s – singer-songwriters like Carole King, Van Morrison and Springsteen.

What is your most memorable moment?

The first time we sold out the ballroom for the Black Keys. We helped them get started with their first manager and booking agent. They’re from Akron and played their first show ever at the Beachland.

What was your greatest challenge?

Not losing money on the acts. In our industry, the average profit margin is 1 percent. We can lose $3,500 in one night if we only sell 100 tickets. We have to pay a guarantee to a booking manager for different amounts such as $5,000, $10,000, etc. In Cleveland, there are more concert venues than ever and free outdoor festivals. We have the same number as Chicago, but they have more people. And, people still are afraid of the neighborhood. Things have changed here. It’s a grassroots Renaissance with a diverse community participating in the arts. This community is full of creative people who are trying new things, such as nonprofits and helping kids. People need to see the full scope of the neighborhood, and we need more support and participation. I want to get the neighborhood to support Waterloo and all of its organizations. All of the businesses can use clients and would appreciate your patronage.

I hear that you are involved in many ventures in the community including airbnbs. Tell us about some of your side projects.

I started a nonprofit called Cleveland Rocks: Past, Present and Future, which is a gallery specializing in music memorabilia. We hope to have rehearsal space in the former bowling alley next to the Beachland that we just purchased. We currently are looking for funding and donations to create a music incubator space with a black box video recording component to teach high school and college students how to create content for bands at reduced rates and also to capture live recordings from the Beachland. I try to help people who are moving into the area looking for available space. I own one Airbnb and manage two others.

What do you do when you are not working on these projects?

My dog goes to the office with me. My boyfriend is a big help to me all the time. He has sailed since he was a child; so, we bought a sailboat. I met him at the Beachland, of course, when his brother brought him to a show.

Beachland Ballroom

Bitesize Business Workshop: Financial Workshop for Small Businesses II

Euclid Chamber of Commerce logo

Join the Euclid Chamber of Commerce at Euclid Public Library, 631 E. 222nd St., Euclid, Ohio, on July 10 from 8:30-10 a.m. for an educational discussion. Are you thinking of starting a business? Or have you been in business for several years? If so, this workshop was designed for you. It will cover:

  • how to create a monthly, quarterly and annual accounting calendar
  • financial software
  • financial reports and how to read them

There is no cost to attend.  Membership is not required. The instructor is Kathleen M. Smychynsky of Kathleen J. Miller & Associates.

Please register here.

What type of employer is HGR? Buyer Spotlight with Ryan Usher

HGR Industrial Surplus Buyer Ryan Usher on inspection

(Q&A with one of HGR’s buyers, Ryan Usher)

When did you start with HGR, and why?        

I started in 2010 as a salesperson. It was my first job out of college.

What is your territory, and what do you do on a daily basis?

My territory is Michigan, Northwest Ohio, and Northeast Indiana.  I visit companies in this area daily looking for equipment to buy. Most of my time is spent with companies here in Michigan where I live.

What do you like most about your job?

I enjoy being able to see how things are made — everything from cars to foods. There’s always something interesting waiting for me each day.

What’s your greatest challenge?

Staying on top of a busy monthly schedule

What’s your most interesting moment at HGR?

I would say working a booth for HGR at a local industrial art show in Lakewood, Ohio.

What do you enjoy doing when you’re not working?

I like to play golf, go mountain biking and hang out on the lake.

Who is your hero or greatest influence/inspiration, and why?

My father. He worked hard to make a good life and always has great advice right when it was needed.

Euclid Chamber of Commerce accepting registration for 2018 golf outing

Euclid Chamber of Commerce golf outing

 

It’s time for the Annual Euclid Chamber of Commerce Golf Outing! Join us for a great day of golf with skill shots, skins games, giveaways and prizes starting at 10:30 a.m. on July 20 at Briardale Greens Golf Course.

All golfers receive lunch, beverages, golf with cart, one ticket to the 19th Hole BBQ, one entry to bocce roll contest, and one entry to darts contest. Single golfers will be assigned to a foursome.

Pre-purchase either mulligans or skins and receive the “String It Out” ($20 value). This 3-foot piece of string, can be used to improve a lie, sink a putt or move a putt. However, each time the string is brought into play, that length used must be cut off. When all the string is gone, it’s gone! (Mulligans: 2 per player $10 per player, $40 per foursome / Skins game $5 per player, $20 per foursome).

Not a golfer? Join us for the 19th Hole BBQ social from 4 – 6 p.m. and try your luck at games and prizes.

Please register here.

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