Cuyahoga County Executive discusses what county government is doing for business at Euclid Chamber of Commerce luncheon

Armond Budish speaks before Euclid Chamber of Commerce luncheon crowd

On Jan. 26 at the Irish American Club, 22770 Lakeshore Blvd., Euclid, Ohio, The Euclid Chamber of Commerce and COSE hosted a special event with Keynote Speaker Armond Budish. Euclid Mayor Kirsten Holzheimer Gail made the introduction. She thanked the chamber and local business for their commitment to economic growth.

About Budish, she says, “He has been an advocate for business, economic development and seniors, and is committed to regional initiatives. But, specific to Euclid, he has been responsive to the city’s needs, especially with the Lincoln Electric expansion, St. Clair expansion, lakefront development, and demolition and senior programs.”

Budish took the floor to discuss the county’s investment in small-business growth and community development, including road and bridge work, removing blight, city master planning, and public safety efforts.

He mentioned that the county is working to create a master data center for law enforcement in order to integrate separate systems when an officer is pulling over a motorist. In addition, the county is installing license-reading cameras on thoroughfares that, in real time, will alert law enforcement in the community so that they can apprehend an individual in the event of a warrant or search effort.

With regard to jobs and training, he says are two initiatives underway:

  1. The creation of a one-stop shop for public benefits that will integrate offices with a career planning coach who will stay with the applicant through his or her career path.
  2. An “Earn & Learn” program to help businesses upskill employees with the potential to advance within the company from an entry-level position by providing financial and training support, which, according to Budish, “will open up more entry-level jobs and, in turn, help people get started.”

In closing, he says, “The county is on the move. Euclid is on the move. It’s only as cities move forward that the county can move forward. The cities are us, and we are the cities.” His colleague, Ed Kraus, Cuyahoga County’s director of regional collaboration, summarizes, “It’s all about leadership.”

Manufacturing undergoes renaissance and evolves its image

MAGNET [M]Power Manufacturing Assembly

On Wednesday, Oct. 19, Manufacturing Advocacy & Growth Network (MAGNET), Cleveland Engineering Society and Crains Cleveland Business hosted its third-annual [M]Power Manufacturing Assembly at the John S. Knight Center, Akron, Ohio.

The event was showcased information, stories and demonstrations that spoke to the renaissance in manufacturing, globally and in Northeast Ohio. Some of the highlights included:

  • A breakfast keynote address by John E. Skory, president, The Illuminating Company
  • A lunch keynote address by Tim Timken, Chairman, CEO & President, TimkenSteel
  • Three breakout sessions that included a choice of area manufacturing speakers and panels who covered topics such as sales and marketing best practices, turnover, innovation, Lean, risk, rapid prototyping, safety, patents, STEM programs, Internet of Things and counterfeiting
  • An exhibitor hall with representatives from education, industry, construction and engineering, agencies, and technology

According to Ethan Karp, president, MAGNET, in his opening remarks, “Ohio ranks second in the nation for new manufacturing jobs created, and small manufacturing powers 40 percent of Northeast Ohio’s revenue.”

During Skory’s keynote speech, he says, “Ohio is third only to Texas and California in the amount of electricity consumed by industry. We are working to support advanced manufacturing and industry by constantly improving systems.”

Then, I attended the morning breakout entitled “Best practices in sales and marketing: identifying and capturing your customer” presented by Dave Winar, CEO, Winar; Dan Yemma, general manager, M7 Technologies; and Craig Coffey, U.S. marketing communications manager, Lincoln Electric. Winar says his company’s motto is, “Common sense, with humor, we will succeed.” That sounds like a great philosophy to live by! He also shared the “salesman ship” graphic that hangs over his desk and says, “The biggest room in the world is the room for improvement.” Coffey focused on the fact that the way people find information now is different from how they did 10 years ago; so, manufacturers need to evolve the way they approach sales as the closer, not the opener and salespeople as deal makers instead of relationship brokers. He also spoke to the importance of a digital footprint and partnering with digital influencers.

In the lunch keynote, Timken quoted a statistic from the National Association of Manufacturers, “For every $1 spent in manufacturing, $1.81 is added to our economy” and that for every worker hired four more jobs are created. You could see his passion for manufacturing when he stated that, for him, manufacturing is “the excitement of making stuff” and the ripple effect of the interconnectedness of people who make things in the region.

In my second breakout session, “Don’t just teach – inspire students: making learning relevant,” Toni Neary, partnership architect, Edge Factor, showed a number of inspiring and, sometimes, chilling videos that illustrate the art of storytelling to connect with youth who “think the world is purchased, not made.” She says that her company partners with manufacturers to show them that “this isn’t your grandfather’s manufacturing facility. It’s not dark, dirty or dangerous.”